RECAP: Philadelphia, PA – Wells Fargo Center

Scroll down for pictures, videos, reviews, and fan reaction!

On Sunday night, Stevie Nicks performed at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia — the 14th show of the 24 Karat Gold Tour.

Stevie Nicks
(Wells Fargo Center)
Stevie Nicks
(Alyda Mir)
Stevie Nicks
(NATty_light3)
Stevie Nicks
(Maryellen Suter Shaw)
Stevie Nicks
(Liberal Paul)
Stevie Nicks
(Liz Johhnson)

Videos

Much love and thanks to Bella Meghan, Dani Haines, hell0allis0n, Homes, Kelly, and Jim Powers for filming and sharing these wonderful videos.

Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around feat. Chrissie Hynde (Jim Powers)

If Anyone Falls (Jim Powers)

Belle Fleur (Jim Powers)

Gypsy (Jim Powers)

Gypsy (Dani Haines Homes)

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FDaniHainesHomes%2Fvideos%2Fvb.203594759657753%2F1489261364424413%2F%3Ftype%3D3&show_text=0&width=700

New Orleans (Jim Powers)

Starshine (Jim Powers)

Stand Back – short clip ()

Crying in the Night (Jim Powers)

If You Were My Love (Jim Powers)

Gold Dust Woman (Jim Powers)

Edge of Seventeen (Jim Powers)

Rhiannon (hell0allis0n)

Leather and Lace (Jim Powers)

Reviews

RECAP: Bethlehem, PA – Sands Event Center

Scroll down for photos, videos, reviews, fan reaction, and the revised set list!

On Saturday night, Stevie Nicks performed at the Sands Event Center in Bethlehem, PA — the lucky 13th show of the 24 Karat Gold Tour.

Stevie has been telling audiences how important it is to do one wants, especially at her age. She stayed true to that advice by dropping “Dreams,” Fleetwood Mac’s only number single in the U.S, from Saturday night’s set list. The perennial favorite has been included in every major solo or Fleetwood Mac tour set list since its release in 1977. Stevie also dropped the related Bella Donna track “Outside the Rain,” another song often included in her set lists. But to the delight of the crowd, she replaced the two songs with Fleetwood Mac’s classic 1982 hit single “Gypsy.” She used the same black-and-white, projection-screen visuals featured in Fleetwood Mac’s 2014-2015’s On with the Show Tour.

During “Stand Back,” Stevie posed with the 1973 Buckingham Nicks record, which a fan had brought for Stevie to sign. (It had already been signed by guitarist Lindsey Buckingham.) A similar moment occurred during Fleetwood Mac’s On with the Show Tour, where a fan presented the album for both Lindsey and Stevie to sign.

Stevie Nicks

During “Edge of Seventeen,” two fans in the front row (Vikki Carlucci and Roseanne Mughetto) gave Stevie a rose-decorated crown, which Stevie graciously accepted and wore on stage (see more photos below).

Stevie Nicks
(Alexa Marie / Jasmine Leslie)

The following slideshow photos by Chris Shipley / The Morning Call

[slideshow_deploy id=’375510′]

The following slideshow photos by Matt Smith / Lehigh Valley Live

[slideshow_deploy id=’375545′]

Stevie Nicks
(Alexa Marie / Jasmine Leslie)
Stevie Nicks
(Alexa Marie / Jasmine Leslie)
Stevie Nicks
(Alexa Marie / Jasmine Leslie)
Stevie Nicks
(Alyssa)
Stevie Nicks
(Robbie Lopez)
Stevie Nicks
(Alyssa)

The following photos are courtesy of Vikki Carlucci:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337922236270052&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337905706271705&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337887096273566&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337880586274217&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337877539607855&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337863979609211&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337844979611111&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337836806278595&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337791012949841&width=700

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvikki.carlucci.9%2Fposts%2F1337781906284085&width=700

 Reviews

Revised Set List (as of 11/19)

  1. Gold and Braid
  2. If Anyone Falls
  3. Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around
  4. Belle Fleur
  5. Gypsy
  6. Wild Heart / Bella Donna
  7. Enchanted
  8. New Orleans
  9. Moonlight (A Vampire’s Dream)
  10. Starshine
  11. Stand Back
  12. Crying in the Night
  13. If You Were My Love
  14. Gold Dust Woman
  15. Edge of Seventeen
    ENCORES
  16. Rhiannon
  17. Leather and Lace

Videos

Much love and thanks to Michelle Cohn, Mickie Esemplare, and Gypsy Soul Sunflower for filming and sharing these wonderful video clips!

Intro/If Anyone Falls (Michelle Cohn)

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkitten.cohn%2Fvideos%2F10153917080771126%2F&show_text=0&width=700

If Anyone Falls – short clip (Mickie Esemplare)

Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around (Gypsy Soul Sunflower)

Gypsy (Gypsy Soul Sunflower)

Bella Donna (Mickie Esemplare)

Enchanted (Gypsy Soul Sunflower)

Starshine (Michelle Cohn)

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkitten.cohn%2Fvideos%2F10153917146156126%2F&show_text=0&width=700


Stand Back (Michelle Cohn)

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkitten.cohn%2Fvideos%2F10153917168361126%2F&show_text=0&width=700

Gold Dust Woman (Michelle Cohn)

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkitten.cohn%2Fvideos%2F10153917726376126%2F&show_text=0&width=700

Edge of Seventeen (Gypsy Soul Sunflower)

Rhiannon – partial (Mickie Esemplare) 

Leather and Lace (Gypsy Soul Sunflower)

 

 

Christine McVie on Mirage, Fleetwood Mac’s future

Christine McVie on Fleetwood Mac’s ‘peculiar’ Mirage Sessions, new LP — as the singer-songwriter looks back on heady days at Château d’Hérouville, discusses band’s future plans

Christine McVie has a confession to make. The 73-year-old singer, songwriter and keyboardist is on the phone with Rolling Stone to discuss the new deluxe reissue of Fleetwood Mac’s 1982 effort, Mirage; but, she admits, she hasn’t actually listened to it yet. “I just now got my copy of the remastered edition in my hands,” McVie says, calling from her home in the U.K. “But I just moved to a flat where I don’t have my DVD or CD player yet. So I’m unable to play it. And there’s all these outtakes and demos and things in there that I certainly haven’t heard since we made them. So I’m most curious to listen.”

Indeed, the new package is a treasure trove for Mac completists (and, apparently, band members). In addition to presenting the original 12-track album – which spent five weeks at Number One and spawned two of the group’s biggest and enduring hits in McVie’s “Hold Me” and Stevie Nicks’ “Gypsy” – in remastered form, the three-CD and DVD set offers up a disc of B sides, titled “Outtakes and Sessions,” as well as a live collection culled from two nights at the L.A. Forum in October 1982 on the Mirage tour. The whole thing is rounded out by a vinyl copy of the album and a DVD in 5.1 surround sound, as well as a booklet with extensive liner notes and photos from the era.

Fleetwood Mac Mirage 1982
(Photo: Neal Preston)

An impressive package, to be sure, and one that is perhaps necessary for an album that, for all its multi-platinum success, never quite gets its due, having been overshadowed in the band’s canon by the career-defining trio of records that preceded it – 1975’s Fleetwood Mac, 1977’s mega-smash Rumours and 1979’s sonically adventurous double album Tusk. In an earlier interview with Rolling Stone, drummer Mick Fleetwood acknowledged that, in such imposing company, Mirage often gets overlooked – a notion that McVie seems to agree with. “It does, and I don’t know why,” she says. But, she adds, “As it stands today, a lot of people know every track on it. Which is quite unbelievable. So I just take it for what it is.”

McVie spent some time reminiscing about the album with RS, from the “unusual” experience of recording at the Château d’Hérouville outside of Paris, to the “nightmare” of filming the video for her song “Hold Me” in the Mojave Desert outside of Palm Springs. But she wasn’t only looking backward. McVie also discussed Fleetwood Mac’s plans for the future, which may include a new album and another world tour. “We’re just gonna keep on doing what we do best,” she said, then laughed. “Which, I’m not really sure what that is!”

What was the state of Fleetwood Mac going into the making of Mirage?

I suppose we all felt in a way that what we were doing was kind of an homage to Rumours, in the sense that, obviously, after Rumours we went completely the opposite way and made a double album of an entirely different nature with Tusk. And for Tusk we had done this hugely long tour. Two world tours, I believe. Then we all disappeared for a few years. But we have a habit of doing that, Fleetwood Mac. Just kind of taking quite long hiatuses. And as we got together again, I think it was Mick who had this idea that perhaps we should enter another bubble-like situation, which was similar to what we had done for the Rumours album, when we recorded in Sausalito. Just taking us away from familiar things, like our families. There was the idea that maybe something would emerge from there that was completely different. Maybe it would make us more creative. And I think it worked, to an extent. It was definitely an unusual experience.

Rather than Sausalito, for Mirage you went to France. Do you recall anything particular about recording at the Château d’Hérouville?

Well, I don’t think any of us remember a huge amount about it! But I don’t remember there being anything bad about it, how about that [laughs]?

That’s a good thing.

Yes. But, I mean, my recollections in general are of thinking, What a peculiar, odd place to be going. …

How so?

It was extremely odd in the sense that it wasn’t really a studio. It really was a rather beaten-up old castle. We were living in it, and then there was another area that was made to be a studio. And there were wine cellars underneath, which I believe we used as echo chambers. So it was unusual, but it also provided a “come-together” sort of moment. Because we really had no options to do anything else. In Sausalito, at least you were close to restaurants, clubs, whatever. But at the chateau, you were just there. We had the table tennis out, we had some radio-controlled helicopters, we had food cooked for us every night on the premises. … I don’t know, it was like some weird, manic kind of resort or something. But I think we got on really well during the making of the record. The actual recording part of it, there were no particular spats I can think of. And some of the tracks are really good.

One of your tracks, “Hold Me,” became the lead single off Mirage, and it was also a big hit. What do you recall about writing it?

I’d co-written it with a friend of mine, Robbie Patton. And when we first recorded it, it was only semi-finished, really. But everybody liked it so we thought, Well, we’ll lay something down on tape and get the bones of it. What we put down was very basic – there were huge chunks that had nothing in them. And then we just built it up in sections.

In the demo version of the song that appears on the second disc of the Mirage deluxe package, you perform the vocal alone. But the final version of “Hold Me” is more of a duet between you and Lindsey [Buckingham]. How did that change come about?

I think some of these things just happen organically. I don’t think it was a plan. But I do know that when I wrote the song with Robbie, he was also a singer, and he was always singing a lower part. And so at some point it became obvious to me that Lindsey would eventually do it.

Do you have a favorite track on the album?

Yes, well, I think “Gypsy” stands out clearly as the best track on the album. Without a doubt.

Why do you feel that way?

I just think the whole song came together in a very cohesive way. It’s very musical. Very melodic. All the parts are right. It’s just a very beautiful record. And, of course, that video – I know the record company spent a lot of money on it.

Reportedly it had the biggest budget of any music video produced up to that point.

Yeah. And it’s one of my favorite videos of all time. And I don’t mean just of Fleetwood Mac’s.

What do you recall of shooting the video for “Hold Me”?

“Hold Me” was a nightmare! It was the middle of the desert in Palm Springs, in the height of summer. I don’t know what possessed us to do that. But we sometimes do crazy things [laughs].

Did it feel unnatural that you were doing it at all? MTV, and the idea of music video being a promotional tool, was a very new concept at the time.

I’m sure we were a bit uneasy with doing it. To some extent, I’ve always felt that the music should be the thing that creates the emotion in you, rather than a video. There are so many songs that have become massive hits merely because the video is great, while the song is pretty rubbish. From that point of view I think I’ve always preferred to listen to a song rather than look at it. So it was a bit difficult.

The directors of both the “Gypsy” and “Hold Me” videos have stated that they encountered some difficulties trying to navigate the thorny romantic relationships between band members at the time. Do you recall as much?

[Laughs] Well, of course! I’m sure it oozes out over the screen when you watch some of the scenes. Yeah, for sure. And I’d be the first one to admit that none of us were stone-cold sober. There was a fair degree of alcohol and drugs going on. But everyone was doing it, so it was kind of the norm.

“I’d be the first one to admit that none of us were stone-cold sober. There was a fair degree of alcohol and drugs going on.”

In contrast to the long tour behind Tusk, the Mirage tour was relatively brief – just two months in the fall of 1982. Was there a reason for such an abbreviated run?

I don’t know why that was. Maybe Stevie was going off to do a tour. I can’t remember if Lindsey had a tour. But it was short, and then we did another vanishing act for another couple years before we came back and did Tango in the Night.

More recently, you took some time away from Fleetwood Mac, before returning in 2014 for a world tour. What is the future of the band at this point?

Well, we cut seven songs in the studio already for the start of a brand-new studio album. Which we did probably nearer two years ago. We shelved that temporarily and then went on the road and did the tour. And now, actually, I think we’re going back in in October to try to finish it off. Stevie hasn’t participated yet, but hope springs eternal. She’s going on a solo tour at the moment. But Lindsey and I, we have plenty of songs. There are tons more in the bag that we have yet to record. And they’re fantastic. So we’re going to carry on and try to finish the record. And then maybe if Stevie doesn’t want to be part of that then we can go out and just do some smaller concerts.

You would consider doing some shows with just you, Lindsey, Mick and John [McVie]?

As a four-piece, yeah. With a view of doing a huge world tour after that, with Stevie.

And would you expect that we’ll see this new album in 2017?

One would hope so, yeah. That’s the plan. And I can’t wait for it to be finished. It’ll be great. And then we’ll hopefully do this world tour with Stevie. And after that, who knows? But we’re all still alive, how about that? So that’s a start.

Richard Bienstock / Rolling Stone / Monday, September 26, 2016

Mick Fleetwood reflects on overlooked Mirage

1982-mirage-album-cover

Mick Fleetwood talks to Rolling Stone about the band’s ‘overlooked’ smash Mirage

Ahead of new reissue, drummer Mick Fleetwood talks “wild and romantic” France sessions, opulent video shoots, and more

“I don’t think it would be wrong to say it sort of got overlooked,” says Fleetwood Mac drummer Mick Fleetwood, reminiscing about his band’s 1982 album, Mirage, which will be reissued in a deluxe package via Warner Bros. on September 23rd. It’s something of an odd statement to make about a record that charted at Number One on the Billboard 200, spawned multiple hit singles and went on to sell more than three million copies. Of course, when you’re in Fleetwood Mac, the definition of what constitutes success is relative.

The album, the band’s 13th studio effort overall and fourth to feature singer Stevie Nicks and singer/guitarist Lindsey Buckingham alongside longtime members Fleetwood, bassist John McVie and singer/keyboardist Christine McVie, came on the heels of one of the more impressive runs in rock: the lineup’s smash 1975 “debut,” Fleetwood Mac; the now-more-than-40-million-selling follow-up, Rumours; and the sprawling and sonically adventurous Buckingham-helmed double–LP Tusk (a commercial “failure” that still managed to move several million copies). By the time the band reconvened for Mirage in May 1981, they had been off the road for close to a year, during which time three members had recorded – but not yet released – solo albums (Buckingham’s Law and Order, Fleetwood’s The Visitor and Nicks’ eventual chart-topping, multi-platinum Bella Donna). That time apart, combined with the tensions that had been brought on by the experimental nature of the Tusk album, left them ready to recapture a bit of the old Rumours magic, so to speak.

[jwplayer mediaid=”373865″]

“There’s no doubt that having come off Tusk there was a conscious effort to make Mirage into more of a band album,” Fleetwood says. “Because Tusk had been very much Lindsey’s vision. And it was a great one – along with [1969’s] Then Play On, it’s probably my favorite Fleetwood Mac album. So it was a highly successful creative moment. But at the time we took some blows for it, and Lindsey in particular, because the album wasn’t as successful as Rumours. How could it be, anyhow? But that being beside the point, I think Lindsey sort of handed back the mantle on Mirage. It was, ‘Let’s just do this as a band.’ That was the vibe going into it.”
The result was an album that, if judged by its two hit singles – Christine McVie’s buoyant “Hold Me” and Stevie Nicks’ somewhat autobiographical “Gypsy” – seemed to represent something of a step back to the concise, sharp-focus pop-rock that had characterized Rumours and Fleetwood Mac. Indeed, says Fleetwood, “If you were a sort of super-intellectual critic, which is maybe not a great place to come from, it would be fair game to say the album kind of went backwards.” But, he adds, “Having said that, the amazing thing is that, looking back on it now, in the present day, so many of those songs are at a very high level in the continuing story of Fleetwood Mac.”

All the more reason, then, to revisit Mirage now. The new three-CD-plus-DVD deluxe package presents the original 12-track album in remastered form, along with one disc of B sides, outtakes and rarities, and another that collects 13 songs from two nights at the Forum in Los Angeles during the band’s 1982 Mirage U.S. tour. Also included is a vinyl copy of the album and a DVD of the original collection in 5.1 surround sound (additionally, there are two-CD, single-disc and digital download versions available). “The fact that we’re talking about it again is actually really cool,” Fleetwood says of Mirage. “Because we ended up making a far better album than we gave ourselves credit for for many years.”

They also made an album that is more varied and quirky than it gets credit for. In addition to the two hit singles, there’s plenty more of the sort of expertly crafted soft rock the band had become known for by that point, such as Christine McVie–penned tracks like “Only Over You” and the propulsive opener (and minor hit) “Love in Store.” But there’s also the brittle electro-pop of Buckingham’s “Empire State” and lilting country-folk of Nicks’ “That’s Alright,” the latter a holdover from the Buckingham Nicks days a decade earlier. Furthermore, unlike the lineup’s three previous efforts, which were recorded mostly in and around California, Fleetwood Mac, along with Ken Caillat and Richard Dashut (who co-produced with Buckingham and the band), tracked Mirage largely in France, at the famed Château d’Hérouville, outside of Paris. Explains Fleetwood of the change of scenery, “My recollect was I asked the band if I could record overseas to help me out with some tax issues. And very kindly they did that. But in truth, knowing me, I think the main purpose of it was to get them the hell out of L.A. so that we could make an album without imploding.”

“I personally had probably too much fun. I used to go into Paris every weekend and misbehave.”

The band’s new environs offered up a different sort of vibe than the Southern California studios they were used to calling home. “We were at the Château, which was an historic place,” Fleetwood recalls. “If you look it up, you’ll see that some incredible shit was done there – [Elton John’s] Honky Chateau and all that. A whole load of people had recorded there. So it was an amazing place. It was wild and romantic. It’s a mansion in the French countryside, with cooks and food and wine, you know?” He laughs. “I personally had probably too much fun. I used to go into Paris every weekend and misbehave and come back for work on Monday morning. But it accomplished what we needed, and, all joking aside, the fact that we were in France and we were in the middle of nowhere, truly I think it had great value.”

The band’s choice of location for recording their music wasn’t the only aspect of Mirage that showed Fleetwood Mac breaking with their past. They also explored new avenues in terms of how they offered up that music for public consumption. Mirage was released in June of 1982, less than a year after the launch of MTV. As a legacy band that had often proved surprisingly adaptable to current trends, Fleetwood Mac embraced the music-video age to great success. So much so, that, rather than merely mimic playing their songs in the clips, as most artists did in the network’s earliest days, Fleetwood Mac opted to take on acting roles. The first single from Mirage, “Hold Me,” came complete with a storyline that showed the band frolicking in the Mojave Desert, with Fleetwood and John McVie playing archeologists who excitedly stumble upon a cache of buried guitars and other musical instruments. The elaborate clip for “Gypsy,” meanwhile, had the distinction of being the most expensive music video ever produced at the time. “I’m really glad we made it,” Fleetwood says, “even though it cost a fortune for us.”

[jwplayer mediaid=”15602″]

As for the shoots themselves, the directors of the videos for both “Hold Me” and “Gypsy” have since discussed the fact that the band’s well-publicized and mythologized romantic entanglements led to some uncomfortable moments on the sets. Fleetwood, however, says he doesn’t recall as much. “I don’t have huge memory of any gossipy things happening,” he says. “But the amount of pain we were used to going through, maybe it was noticeable. Although we had an uncanny ability to suck it up. But ‘Gypsy’ especially, it’s interesting because they’re featuring Lindsey and Stevie dancing in it and you’re going, ‘This is quite profound. …’ It was like, ‘Wow, that’s a scene!'”

He continues: “In general, though, we were really professional, and I believe from memory we were all hugely cooperative and into [doing the videos], really. There was no ‘I don’t wanna fucking do that,’ one-shot-and-we’re-out-of-there type stuff. And the directors, they were young filmmakers with big budgets, and they seemed quite conversant with handling lunacy. So they were fun days.” Fleetwood laughs. “I mean, to me everything was fun because I was having a party 24/7. So it didn’t really fucking matter! But I think we were good candidates for that sort of thing.”

It would seem that Fleetwood Mac were in fact very good candidates for that sort of thing, as both “Hold Me” and “Gypsy” became staples on MTV, helping the band to achieve two of the biggest hits of their career. In fact, Fleetwood now acknowledges that “those songs became more memorable than the album as a whole. And that’s sort of an unusual slant.

Mirage is part of our history,” he continues, “and as the band heads no doubt to a wind-down of some description in the next few years ahead, I think these types of cataloging events are important. Because it’s certainly not an album to be discarded. And now this little project is representing it, and giving it measured and investigated amounts of kudos. That’s a good thing.”

Richard Bienstock / Rolling Stone / Tuesday, September 20, 2016

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac revisits Mirage, inside the studio and out

After Rumours became the biggest pop album of the 1970s, Fleetwood Mac followed it up with 1979’s shockingly different Tusk — a critical success, but a relative commercial flop. Where to go from there? 1982’s Mirage, which leans closer to the Rumours sound while maintaining a distinct identity. The band will Mirage in September with a new deluxe package that showcases the remastered original album, a full disc worth of alternate takes and B-sides, and a third disc of live tracks.

Read the full review at SILive.com

LISTEN: Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Gypsy’ (Early Version)

Warner Bros. Records is ready to reissue a remastered and reloaded Fleetwood Mac Mirage on July 29

Warner Bros. Records is releasing a remastered deluxe edition of Fleetwood Mac’s classic album, Mirage, and ahead of the debut they’ve provided us with a sample of “Gypsy” that is stunningly crisp and clear. It’s like hearing the song again for the first time.

The early version of “Gypsy” sounds like it could have been released last week, rather than in 1982, and the deluxe reissue will feature a 3-CD set with remastered sound, and rare, unreleased recordings. A 2-CD edition, and digital edition will also be available on July 29.

Listen to the early sample below, and scroll down for more details on the re-issue. Check out FleetwoodMac.com for more.

The re-mastered edition of Mirage features the iconic songs “Hold Me,” “Love In Store,” plus “Gypsy”.

Both the deluxe and expanded editions of the album include a bonus disc with 19 tracks that are either rare or outtakes, including “Empire State” and “Book Of Love”. The third disc on the deluxe release of Mirage include 12 live performances from the band’s 1982 U.S. tour.

Gypsy – Early Version (for US listeners)

Gypsy – Early Version (for Canadian listeners)

Read the full article at The Gate.

W. Andrew Powell / The Gate (Canada) / Thursday, June 16, 2016

Hear Fleetwood Mac’s Early Version of ‘Gypsy’

Fleetwood Mac’s hit 1982 album, Mirage, is set for reissue on July 29th in an expanded package that contains live tracks, early versions of familiar songs, outtakes and previously unheard studio jams. It will be available as a bare-bones remastered album, a two-CD expanded edition and a deluxe-edition box set that contains three CDs, a DVD and a vinyl LP. Preview the set below with an early version of the Stevie Nicks-sung single “Gypsy.”

Mirage came just three years after Fleetwood Mac released their experimental double LP Tusk, but in that time both Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham launched solo careers and MTV drastically changed the pop-music landscape. Unlike many Seventies rock bands that struggled in this new era, Fleetwood Mac thrived. Mirage singles “Hold Me” and “Oh Diane” became big hits on radio and MTV, and the band supported the LP with an extremely successful American arena tour.

Fleetwood Mac’s next album, 1987’s Tango in the Night, was their final release with the classic Rumors-era lineup, though the band did reunite for a tour in 1997. In 2014, keyboardist Christine McVie returned to the band after a long absence for a rapturously received reunion tour. There’s been talk of a new studio album, but there’s no clear sign they’ve actually begun work on it.

Here is the track listing to the new deluxe edition of Mirage:

Disc One: Original Album – 2016 Remaster

  1. “Love in Store”
  2. “Can’t Go Back”
  3. “That’s Alright”
  4. “Book of Love”
  5. “Gypsy”
  6. “Only Over You”
  7. “Empire State”
  8. “Straight Back”
  9. “Hold Me”
  10. “Oh Diane”
  11. “Eyes of the World”
  12. “Wish You Were Here

Disc Two: B-Sides, Outtakes, Sessions

  1. “Love in Store” (Early Version)*
  2. “Suma’s Walk” a.k.a. “Can’t Go Back” (Outtake)*
  3. “That’s Alright” (Alternate Take)*
  4. “Book of Love” (Early Version)*
  5. “Gypsy” (Early Version)*
  6. “Only Over You” (Alternate Version)*
  7. “Empire State” (Early Version)*
  8. “If You Were My Love” (Outtake)*
  9. “Hold Me” (Early Version)*
  10. “Oh Diane” (Early Version)*
  11. “Smile at You” (Outtake)*
  12. “Goodbye Angel” (Original Outtake)*
  13. “Eyes of the World” (Alternate Early Version)*
  14. “Straight Back” (Original Vinyl Version)
  15. “Wish You Were Here” (Alternate Version)*
  16. “Cool Water”
  17. “Gypsy” (Video Version)
  18. “Put a Candle in the Window” (Run-Through)*
  19. “Teen Beat” (Outtake)*
  20. “Blue Monday” (Jam)*

*Previously Unissued

Disc Three: Mirage Live 1982

  1. “The Chain”
  2. “Gypsy”
  3. “Love in Store”
  4. “Not That Funny”
  5. “You Make Loving Fun”
  6. “I’m So Afraid”
  7. “Blue Letter”
  8. “Rhiannon”
  9. “Tusk”
  10. “Eyes of the World”
  11. “Go Your Own Way”
  12. “Sisters of the Moon”
  13. “Songbird”

Disc Four: 5.1 Surround Mix & 24/96 Stereo Audio of Original Album (DVD)

Mirage (Vinyl)

Side One

  1. “Love in Store”
  2. “Can’t Go Back”
  3. “That’s Alright”
  4. “Book of Love”
  5. “Gypsy”
  6. “Only Over You”

Side Two

  1. “Empire State”
  2. “Straight Back”
  3. “Hold Me”
  4. “Oh Diane”
  5. “Eyes of the World”
  6. “Wish You Were Here”

Andy Greene / Rolling Stone / Thursday, June 9, 2016

VIDEO: Gypsy (Acoustic)