Clear Channel, Fleetwood Mac sign landmark royalties agreement

Fleetwood Mac 2013 Neal Preston

Clear Channel Media & Entertainment has cut a deal to pay performance royalties to Fleetwood Mac for songs from its recently released “Extend Play” EP that are broadcast on its 850 terrestrial radio stations. According to Clear Channel, it’s the first rights partnership between a radio company and an artist.

“Reaching an agreement with [Fleetwood Mac] is the clearest sign yet that this kind of revenue-sharing model represents the industry’s future — it is a win-win-win, for artists, fans and the music business,” said Clear Channel CEO Bob Pittman in a statement. “We look forward to helping Fleetwood Mac get their hit songs to their fans on whatever platform or device they want to find them.”

The deal may be the first with an artist but Clear Channel has already cut deals with 11 indie labels: Big Machine Label Group, Glassnote Entertainment Group, eOne, DashGo, Robbins Entertainment, Naxos, rpm Entertainment, Wind-up Records, Fearless Records, Zojak Records and Dualtone Records.

While the U.S. music industry has long sought performance royalties for master rights owners and artists — something which is paid in most other countries — it has never achieved that right in the U.S. The closest the industry has come was in 2010 when at the behest of Congress, record labels and radio station negotiated such a performance right and royalty, but those talks broke down and the legislation wasn’t enacted before the session ended. In 2012, Clear Channel began negotiating such deals, first with Big Machine, in exchange for predictable, reduced rates for its digital radio service, iHeartRadio.

“Fleetwood Mac has consistently pushed the envelope — creating new sounds, making music that seems designed for radio and looking at the industry in new ways,” said Fleetwood Mac representative Azoff Music Management head honcho Irving Azoff, who is also on the Clear Channel board of directors. “It’s fitting that a group that’s played such an integral role in radio and music history would be the first band to take such a major step — helping the music industry create a sustainable digital marketplace so it can thrive for decades to come. We’re delighted to join Clear Channel in creating a new model for the music industry one that will be good for performing artists, good for music fans, and good for the people who have invested their talent, time and money.”

Ed Christman / Billboard | Wednesday, June 12, 2013


Related article

Clear Channel and Fleetwood Mac sign landmark revenue-sharing agreement

Clear Channel Media & Entertainment and Fleetwood Mac today announced a landmark agreement – the first direct performing rights partnership between a radio company and an artist – that will enable the group to receive revenue from airplay on Clear Channel’s digital and broadcast radio platforms. The group’s new EP, Extended Play, features the first recording of new Fleetwood Mac music since the release of “Say You Will” over a decade ago.

“Fleetwood Mac has consistently pushed the envelope – creating new sounds, making music that seems designed for radio and looking at the industry in new ways,” said Irving Azoff of Azoff Music Management, a representative of the band. “It’s fitting that a group that’s played such an integral role in radio and music history would be the first band to take such a major step — helping the music industry create a sustainable digital marketplace so it can thrive for decades to come. We’re delighted to join Clear Channel in creating a new model for the music industry, one that will be good for performing artists, good for music fans, and good for the people who have invested their talent, time and money.”

“Fleetwood Mac has blown me away from the first time I heard them – they are the perfect group for radio,” said Bob Pittman, CEO of Clear Channel. “Reaching an agreement with them is the clearest sign yet that this kind of revenue-sharing model represents the industry’s future – it is a win-win-win, for artists, fans and the music business. We look forward to helping Fleetwood Mac get their hit songs to their fans on whatever platform or device they want to find them.”

One of the most popular bands in history and a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the legendary Fleetwood Mac has sold over 100 million albums worldwide, including “Rumours,” one of the best-selling albums of all time, which spawned four top-ten singles, won the Grammy for Album of the Year in 1977 and remained No. 1 on the Billboard charts for 31 weeks. The band, which formed in London in 1967, has produced 17 studio albums over its long career.

The groundbreaking agreement with the iconic band follows similar agreements with a number of independent recording labels but it is the first to be negotiated directly with an artist or group, creating a milestone for Clear Channel and the industry. All of these agreements represent a significant step forward in building a sustainable business model for Internet radio. The independent labels who have similar agreements with Clear Channel include Big Machine Label Group, Glassnote Entertainment Group, eOne, DashGo, Robbins Entertainment, Naxos, rpm Entertainment, Wind-up Records, Fearless Records, Zojak Records and Dualtone Records.

About Clear Channel Media & Entertainment

With 243 million monthly listeners in the U.S., Clear Channel Media & Entertainment has the largest reach of any radio or television outlet in America. Clear Channel Media & Entertainment serves 150 cities through 850 owned radio stations. The company’s radio stations and content can be heard on AM/FM stations, HD digital radio channels, Sirius/XM satellite, on the Internet at iHeartRadio.com and on the company’s radio station websites, on the iHeartRadio mobile application on iPads and smartphones, and used via navigation systems from TomTom, Garmin and others.

The company’s operations include radio broadcasting, online and mobile services and products, live concerts and events, syndication, music research services and independent media representation. Clear Channel Media and Entertainment is a division of CC Media Holdings, Inc. (OTCBB: CCMO), a leading global media and entertainment company.

Business Wire / Wednesday, June 12, 2013

ALBUM REVIEW: Going their own way

Fleetwood Mac Extended Play 2013By Abhinav Kaul and Ranaditya Baruah / Financial Chronicle (New Delhi, India)
Thursday, June 6, 2013

When I first heard Fletwood Mac, they were already way past their prime. Their glory years were long gone but it never showed when Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham took the stage. Nicks’ voice has remained as sultry and phenomenal as ever and Buckingham’s mellow guitar licks have somehow managed to get cleaner over the years.

The British-American rock band was formed way back in 1967. The band has undergone numerous changes over the years, but most fans identify Fleetwood Mac with Mick Fleetwood on the drums, John McVie on bass, Lindsey Buckingham on the guitar and Stevie Nicks on vocals.

There is nothing in the music business that these rock and roll hall of famers have not seen. So, one might think after a 10 year break the band may have finally hung up their boots bringing an end to an illustrious career.

But putting an end to all such speculations, last month, Fleetwood Mac announced Extended Play, a four-song EP of new material — their first since 2003’s Say You Will, which had reached No 6 on the UK album charts, and achieved gold sales.

However, fans must be warned that this album is more a solo project of Lindsey Buckingham than a Fleetwood Mac album, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing as most songs play it safe, adhering to the mid-tempo signature rhythms that best define the band’s music.

The lead track, “Sad Angel,” opens with the familiar jangles of “Go Your Own Way” — a momentary callback before we finally hear this new version of Fleetwood Mac. Like many of the group’s greatest songs, “Sad Angel” reflects on Lindsey and Stevie’s complex relationship. The track is a wonderful beginning to the record as “Sad Angel” is perhaps the most Fleetwood Mac-y on the album. It reminds one of the good stuff that the band belted out on record after record during their prime.

The new version of “Without You” is another welcome rendition. It’s an acoustic duet between Buckingham and Nicks — the only real presence she has on Extended Play. The 40-year-old track was most likely penned while they were madly in love with one another. Times have changed and both musicians have matured a great deal over the years but the song would definitely remind the old-timers of a more innocent time. The song was originally meant for a possible second Buckingham-Nicks album, before being dropped.

The following track, “It Takes Time,” is the only forgettable track on the album, but Fleetwood Mac close strong with the power-pop feel of “Miss Fantasy.”

Extended Play is a short tease, but these tracks aren’t throwaways or an attempt at a quick cash-in. Lindsey Buckingham wouldn’t associate with something like that. A known perfectionist, he co-produced the EP alongside Mitchell Froom, and the attention paid to detail shows. The songs don’t deviate far from Fleetwood Mac’s mellow-rock wheelhouse, and why should they? That’s exactly the kind of stuff that fans want from them.

Modern production techniques, which enhance Buckingham’s clean guitar tones and his vocal harmonies with Nicks, however seem too obvious at times.

Extended Play’s fleeting duration might be something fans would complain about. However, for being an out-of-the-blue release, Fleetwood Mac fans should be more than satisfied.

Fleetwood Mac’s Extended Play now available for download on Amazon

Fleetwood Mac Extended Play 2013Fleetwood Mac’s Extended Play (EP), previously available exclusively on iTunes, is now available for purchase on Amazon. The digital EP is $3.96 for all four songs.

Preview the songs

Sad Angel (4:03)
Without You (4:39) https://stevienicksinfo.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/02-without-you.mp3%20
It Takes Time (4:09)
Miss Fantasy (4:17)

MUSIC REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac, Extended Play (iTunes)

Lindsey Buckingham Stevie Nicks 2013News OK
Friday, May 3, 2013

Fleetwood Mac Extended Play (iTunes)

In the decade since Fleetwood Mac released 2003’s Say You Will, a new surge of interest in the group’s distinctive pop style has taken hold in the modern pop, alternative and country communities. Recent music by artists as diverse as Cut Copy, Lady Antebellum, Vampire Weekend, Haim, Daft Punk, John Mayer and Little Big Town was inspired by the warmth and harmonic richness of Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham/Stevie Nicks era, and last year’s tribute album, Just Tell Me That You Want Me, offered persuasive testimony to the band’s enduring influence.

John McVie Mick Fleetwood 2013But for all the enthusiasm those acts show for Fleetwood Mac’s pop shimmer, most would balk at walking a mile in their shoes, and continued tension within the band is a key reason why they only mustered four tracks for Extended Play, Fleetwood Mac’s first new material since 2003. But this concise burst of fresh songs, mostly co-produced by Buckingham and Mitchell Froom (Crowded House), says more about what it really means to be part of Fleetwood Mac than anything since Rumours and Tusk. Buckingham takes it on directly with “Sad Angel,” which addresses the challenge of getting Nicks on board with new Mac material while the fans are “calling out for more.” Even the inclusion of “Without You,” an unreleased Buckingham Nicks song, underlines the continued tension — putting the song on Extended Play was a compromise after Nicks and Buckingham could not agree on how to handle the 40th anniversary of the Buckingham Nicks album.

ALBUM REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac returns

Fleetwood Mac Extended Play 2013

Fleetwood Mac, Extended Play (LMJS Productions) * * * 1/2

By Howard Cohen / Miami Herald
Friday, May 3, 2013

Fleetwood Mac’s first new music since 2003’s Say You Will is short on Stevie Nicks, who resisted recording a full album with the group. The resulting four-track EP, released to iTunes as a digital download, makes you wish for more on the strength of Lindsey Buckingham’s three new songs.

Nicks contributes the folksy “Without You,” a reject from the 1973 sessions for the Buckingham Nicks LP. The pair harmonize over Buckingham’s tinny acoustic strumming. Meh.

Much better: Buckingham’s fresh songs in which he returns to writing crisp, accessible, engaging California pop/rock, like the infectiously melodic and rhythmically driving “Sad Angel” and the breezy “Miss Fantasy,” a piquant taste of Mirage-era Mac that makes great use of the famed rhythm section of Mick Fleetwood and John McVie.

His stark solo piano ballad, “It Takes Time” — imagine Christine McVie’s “Songbird” as its closest cousin — intrigues the most because it’s unlike anything the guitarist has released.