Dueling duos

Justin Bieber (“Love Yourself,” “Sorry”) and Selena Gomez (“Hands to Myself, “Same Old Love”) are both in the Billboard Top 10 this week, prompting the following question: “Have any other former couples previously shared space in the top 10 with separate hits?”

On the Dec. 26, 1981 Hot 100, Stevie Nicks ranked at No. 8 with “Leather and Lace,” which had reached the top 10 the week before. On the Dec. 26, chart, Lindsey Buckingham rose to No. 10 with “Trouble,” joining her in the bracket. The latter would spend three total weeks at No. 10 before climbing to its No. 9 peak for two weeks, all while “Leather and Lace” remained in the top 10, lifting to its No. 6 peak in the former’s final week in the region.

So, for five weeks in 1981-82, Nicks and Buckingham each placed in the Hot 100’s top 10 simultaneously with their own songs. (Like Bieber and Gomez this week, they avoided back-to-back chart contact throughout that stretch.) Making things potentially more awkward, Nicks had moved on to another … as her hit is a duet, of course, with Don Henley (whom she did date).

“Relations with Lindsey are exactly as they have been since we broke up,” according to Nicks, who dated Buckingham in the ’70s, helping lead to Fleetwood Mac’s iconic breakup-inspired album, 1977’s Rumours, as they remained bandmates (after first teaming as duo Buckingham Nicks). “He and I will always be antagonizing to each other, and we will always do things that will irritate each other, and we really know how to push each other’s buttons.

“We know exactly what to say when we really want to throw a dagger in. And, I think that that’s not different now than it was when we were 20. And, I don’t think it will be different when we’re 80.”

(Beyond continuing in Fleetwood Mac to this day, Nicks and Buckingham teamed 20 years ago this year for “Twisted,” a single worth revisiting from the movie Twister.)

As for Bieber and Gomez reuniting … not just in the Hot 100’s top 10? Gomez recently said, bluntly: “What I would love to be printed is that I am so beyond done with talking about that, and him.”

Bieber is more nostalgic, and hopeful. “We have a lot of history together, so it could possibly happen. I think we’re both just on our own journeys, figuring ourselves out. Once we’ve figured ourselves out, we could maybe come together and make an awesome duo.”

Read the full article at Billboard.

Stevie Nicks devastated by Glenn Frey’s death

Stevie Nicks reacts to Glenn Frey’s death by posting a rare statement to her official pages.

Stevie Nicks says she’s “brokenhearted” over Glenn Frey’s death in a statement published on her official Facebook page and website.
Stevie Nicks Facebook

Website screen cap

Glenn Frey, guitarist and founding member of the legendary Rock and Roll Hall of Fame band The Eagles, died Monday, January 18, in New York, succumbing to complications from Rheumatoid Arthritis, Acute Ulcerative Colitis and Pneumonia. The Eagles family published the following statement on its official website:

It Is With The Heaviest of Hearts That We Announce…

…the passing of our comrade, Eagles founder, Glenn Frey, in New York City on Monday, January 18th, 2016. Glenn fought a courageous battle for the past several weeks but, sadly, succumbed to complications from Rheumatoid Arthritis, Acute Ulcerative Colitis and Pneumonia.

The Frey family would like to thank everyone who joined Glenn to fight this fight and hoped and prayed for his recovery. Words can neither describe our sorrow, nor our love and respect for all that he has given to us, his family, the music community & millions of fans worldwide.

Cindy Frey | Taylor Frey | Deacon Frey | Otis Frey|
Don Henley | Joe Walsh | Timothy B. Schmit | Bernie Leadon | Irving Azoff

Eagles drummer Don Henley issued the following tribute to Frey:

“He was like a brother to me; we were family, and like most families, there was some dysfunction. But, the bond we forged 45 years ago was never broken, even during the 14 years that the Eagles were dissolved. We were two young men who made the pilgrimage to Los Angeles with the same dream: to make our mark in the music industry — and with perseverance, a deep love of music, our alliance with other great musicians and our manager, Irving Azoff, we built something that has lasted longer than anyone could have dreamed. But, Glenn was the one who started it all. He was the spark plug, the man with the plan. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of popular music and a work ethic that wouldn’t quit. He was funny, bullheaded, mercurial, generous, deeply talented and driven. He loved is wife and kids more than anything. We are all in a state of shock, disbelief and profound sorrow. We brought our two-year ‘History of the Eagles Tour’ to a triumphant close at the end of July and now he is gone. I’m not sure I believe in fate, but I know that crossing paths with Glenn Lewis Frey in 1970 changed my life forever, and it eventually had an impact on the lives of millions of other people all over the planet. It will be very strange going forward in a world without him in it. But, I will be grateful, every day, that he was in my life. Rest in peace, my brother. You did what you set out to do, and then some.”

Stevie and Frey last appeared together in 2014 at the 29th Annual Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony, where they paid tribute to inductee Linda Ronstadt by performing her single “It’s So Easy” with Sheryl Crow, Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris and Carrie Underwood. Stevie met Frey in the mid-’70s when Fleetwood Mac and The Eagles were rising to global prominence.

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LISTEN: Stevie Nicks, Don Henley release new duet

Thirty-four years after they released their smash hit single ‘Leather and Lace,” Don Henley and Stevie Nicks reunite for a heartbreaking ballad.

Don Henley Cass County cover
Don Henley – Cass County, 18-track edition available exclusively from Target.

Don Henley and Stevie Nicks have released a new duet called “It Don’t Matter To The Sun.” The lullaby ballad appears on the 18-track edition of Henley’s new album Cass County, available exclusively at Target. Listen to the full song and read the song lyrics below.

Country singer Garth Brooks, assuming the fictitious Australian rock persona Chris Gaines, originally recorded the song for In the Life of Chris Gaines in 1999. Rosie Thomas recorded a version of the song for her album If Songs Could Be Held in 2005, as well as Glee alumnus Matthew Morrison, who covered the song in 2011.

Over the years, Stevie Nicks and Don Henley have sung together many times in the studio and on the stage. Their studio collaborations include the Top 5 hit “Leather and Lace” (1981), “The Highwayman” (1981), and “Reconsider Me” (1985). Nicks and Henley were romantically linked in the mid-1970s.

Cass County track list (Target edition):

“Bramble Rose” (duet with Mick Jagger & Miranda Lambert)
“The Cost of Living” (duet with Merle Haggard)
“No, Thank You”
“Waiting Tables”
“Take a Picture of This”
“Too Far Gone”*
“That Old Flame” (duet with Martina McBride)
“The Brand New Tennessee Waltz”*
“Words Can Break Your Heart”
“When I Stop Dreaming” (duet with Dolly Parton)
“Praying for Rain”
“Too Much Pride”*
“She Sang Hymns Out of Tune”*
“Train in the Distance”
“A Younger Man”
“Where I Am Now”
“It Don’t Matter to the Sun” (duet with Stevie Nicks)+
“Here Comes Those Tears Again”
+

*not included on the standard version.
+available only on the Target edition.

It Don’t Matter to the Sun

It don’t matter to the sun
If you go or if you stay
No, the sun is gonna rise, gonna rise
Shine down on another day
There will be a tomorrow
Even if you choose to leave
‘Cause it don’t matter to the sun, no, no
It matters to me

It ain’t gonna change the world
If you walk out that door
This old world will just keep spinnin’ ’round
Spinnin’ ’round
Like it did the day before
‘Cause to them it makes no difference
It just keeps on keepin’ time
It ain’t gonna stop the world, no, no
It’ll be the end of mine

What can I say
What can I do
I’m still in love
Why aren’t you

It don’t matter to the moon
If you’re not in my life
No, the moon will just keep hangin’ ’round
Hangin’ ’round
Like it’s just another night
You’ll find another place to shine down
On some other lover’s dreams
It don’t matter to the moon, no
It matters to me

It don’t matter to the moon, no, no
But it matters to me

(Gordon Kennedy/Wayne Kirkpatrick/Tommy Sims)
© 1999 Bases Loaded Music/Universal Music Corp. (ASCAP)/Sell the Cow Music/Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp. (BMI)/Sundance Music/Universal Music-MGB Songs (ASCAP)

From the heart

By Leigh Flayton
City AZ
Friday, November 30, 2001

Local hero Stevie Nicks’ national tour culminates in a hometown show that’s dear to her family’s heart — it’s also the hottest ticket of the year.

She’s back. Phoenix’s favorite songbird returns home this December 6 to play her annual benefit concert for the Arizona Heart Institute at America West Arena. And, what can fans expect this year, whether they score the premium $1,000 tickets–which include access to the private post-concert party — or the more affordable, yet still intimate, seats throughout the venue?

We’ll have many of the same guests this year: Sheryl Crow, Don Henley, Lindsey Buckingham,” Nicks said recently via telephone. “They’re all my friends; they’re my circle.”

Also in attendance will be any of us who were smart enough to purchase tickets, for we will not only see a one-of-a-kind show, we’ll be supporting a terrific cause. The benefit concert is the passion of Stevie’s father, Jess Nicks — whose brother and mother died of heart disease — and who has suffered from the disease himself, along with Stevie’s mother, Barbara.

“My dad is almost 77 years old, and when you get to be 77 you get to thinking, ‘I better start doing all this,'” Nicks says. “He is determined to build heart hospitals, and these benefits keep him going because he really goes to work on this. It makes him young again.”

Last year’s show was a magical musical moment. Nicks sang unforgettable versions of her greatest works, including acoustic renderings of “Landslide” and “Gypsy”, with longtime friend, collaborator, and former lover Lindsey Buckingham. Also, many of the Nicks’ friends were onhand singing duets with her in addition to their own songs. Yet the best part was that every cent derived from the performance — titled “Stevie Nicks and Friends” — went to the Arizona Heart Institute Foundation’s efforts to eradicate heart disease, and to provide for advanced research into the treatments.

“It’s not like collecting funds that spray into the wind and you have no idea where they go,” Nicks says. “The second my father gets that money in his hand, he takes it to where it’s gotta go.”

Nicks has been benefiting millions with her music during the last three decades, beginning with her days with Fleetwood Mac. Since 1981, when her solo career took off upon the release of her first album, Bella Donna, she has been one of America’s premier artists — a fact that she takes very seriously.

Her dedication to what she does was almost usurped, like most Americans’, last fall. Nicks was on tour in New York on September 11, the 21st-century’s very own date of infamy. Four days later, her first performance since the attacks was scheduled for Atlantic City.

“It’s been very hard for me to be out on the road [since the attacks],” Nicks admits. “I thought about going home, because I just didn’t know that I could stand up there and smile. There were some days when I was calling home every day, really hysterical.” But Nicks got through that difficult first show. “It was hard to go back onstage. I have been very afraid, but we all have to get back on the plane. If we don’t, this country isn’t going to make it.”

That concern inspired Nicks to write a poem “We Get Back on the Plane” which she composed aboard the nerve-racking flight out of Atlantic City, which was accompanied by an F-16 fighter plane. When we spoke a week later, she admitted she had been “song creeping” around the piano, knowing she would soon set the words she wrote to music.

“My Mom and Dad keep going back to World War II,” Nicks says. “They keep saying, ‘You’re part of the USO right now; you must do this.’ I know that if we don’t get back to work, we’re in huge trouble.”

So Stevie Nicks — the artist — took her own advice and got back to work. “I told the audience in Atlantic City to ‘let us let the music just take us away,'” she says. And, she admits, it did.

Nicks says she knows that music does make a difference, and now, during the height of the greatest American crisis in a generation, she still believes music can help change the world.

“During Desert Storm I received a flag from one of the first tanks that went in,” she recalls. “They were listening to my music and they made a very big deal to me about how important it was, to listen to my records. Entertainment — per se — is really uplifting. And now, of course, all my songs take on a different meaning.”

Nicks has said she’s made sacrifices in her pursuit of the artist’s life, but her returns have meant so much to her listeners as well as for herself. She says she “knows” when she’s written something particularly meaningful; usually because it happens so quickly.

I knew at the end of “Has Anyone Ever Written Anything for You”, I knew at the end of “Landslide”, and I knew at the end of “Love Is” from the new album,” she admits about realizing the brilliance of her songwriting. “I do have a feeling of it because what happens with songs is, sometimes you get halfway through and stop. Something isn’t right.”

But sometimes, according to Nicks, it’s a flawless process.

“There are ones that just flow out with no problem,” she admits. “I really did write a poem called “We Get Back On the Plane”, and I don’t know when I’m going to write it [as a song]. I might write it; I could write it. Those songs all have a really great story; they all have a real reason to be written. The ones that are really memorable are the ones that give that feeling of I have to do this. And, it’s going to be forever.”

Like the heart hospitals Jess Nicks is determined to build, this year’s teaming of Nicks & Nicks will be yet another gift to the Valley. Jess will take his annual seat in the front row and beam — no doubt — as our desert angel takes the stage.

For tickets call 602.266.2200 ext. 4619 or go to http://www.azheart.com.