VIDEO: Linda Ronstadt 2014 RRHoF medley

Stevie Nicks, Sheryl Crow, Glenn Frey, Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt, and Carrie Underwood performed a medley of songs in honor of 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Linda Ronstadt. HBO aired highlights of the concert on Saturday, May 31. Watch an excerpt of their performance below.

(Video courtesy of Crow Archives)

TV ALERT: 2014 RRHoF Induction Ceremony concert premieres Saturday

(Photo: Kevin Mazur / WireImage)
(Photo: Kevin Mazur / WireImage)

The 29th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, featuring Stevie’s musical tribute to Linda Ronstadt, will premiere Saturday, May 31 on HBO at 8pm.

Inductees include: Peter Gabriel, Hall and Oates, KISS, Nirvana, Linda Ronstadt and Cat Stevens. Guests include: Chris Martin, Glenn Frey, Michael Stipe, Questlove, Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Bruce Springsteen, Lorde, Carrie Underwood, Emmylou Harris, Tom Morello, Sheryl Crow and more.

Stevie Nicks discusses Linda Ronstadt, RRHoF scene

Stevie Nicks performs at the 29th Annual Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony. (Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris / WireImage)
Stevie Nicks performs at the 29th Annual Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony. (Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris / WireImage)

Fleetwood Mac frontwoman Stevie Nicks paid tribute to Linda Ronstadt at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony Thursday night, along with an all-star lineup of women Ronstadt influenced, as Ronstadt was unable to make an appearance herself. Following performances by Carrie Underwood, Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris and Sheryl Crow, Nicks sang Buddy Holly’s “It’s So Easy,” which Ronstadt released as her own single 1977 album Simple Dreams, and the Everly Brothers’ “When Will I Be Loved,” a 1975 single for Ronstadt off her Heart Like a Wheel LP. Following her performance, she told Rolling Stone how Ronstadt left an indelible impression on her at an early age.

Why did you want to pay tribute to Linda Ronstadt?

Because Linda was one of the first artists that really caught my eye when I was in high school. And I really could sing just like her. I’m sure a lot of people could. Because if you study her, you can get her vibe. So I could sing “Different Drum.” I couldn’t sing it as good as Carrie Underwood just sang it, I have to say, God bless her. But I got it pretty good, and I could also play it on my guitar – and I’m not the best guitar player. But I learned it and I could sing it.

Linda was really a rock star, but she was tinged with the country thing. And so she figured out a way to blend those things. So she was rockin’, and she hung out with the rockers, the rock bands. But she still had that little bit of country that went along with her. And, her voice was so spectacular that all the men surrounding her – Don Henley and Glenn Frey and Jackson Browne – that whole bunch of guys that was so fantastic. So she was like myself.

How else did you relate to her?

She was never gonna do a song she didn’t love. Because I’ve gotten in terrible arguments with producers about a song that they’ll give me, and they’ll go, “This could be your next hit single.” And I’m like, “I don’t care because I hate it, and I’m not doing it.” And huge arguments over that. And I’m sure Linda Ronstadt was the same way, where she’d say, “No, I’m not doing that song. I don’t like it.” So she was just strong.

And I think that when she was 15, 16, 17, she was probably just like me. She was marching through the halls of her high school going, ‘Everybody should be moving aside right now, because, “Don’t you know who I am? I’m Linda Ronstadt, future huge rock star.” It’s just in her. I watched her and I listened to her. And I loved all her songs and I got told great stories about her from all the amazing people that did know her. And I don’t really know how she slipped through the cracks, and I never really got to meet her. I should’ve gotten to meet her. Anyway, she was just like the perfect storm of everything meeting at the same time in perfection when she hit the radio.

Did you speak with her before tonight? How did you come to sing in the tribute?

We were just asked. I think that me, Carrie, Sheryl, Emmylou, Bonnie – I think the five of us certainly had no idea that we’d be chosen to do this. But it was so great because I really think we were the perfect five to do it, and I think that Glenn Frey was the perfect person to induct her because they really were good friends. So he knew her really well.

What has the backstage scene been like for you?

Well, I couldn’t even watch Cat Stevens because it was right before us. And I started crying. I met him last night at Jimmy Fallon, and I got a moment to tell him how inspirational he had been to Lindsey Buckingham and to myself. For Buckingham-Nicks, Cat Stevens was one of the people that we listened to daily and sang along to those songs and played those songs and harmonized to those songs. And they meant so much to us. I mean in so many ways, they meant so much to us, not just because they were good songs; to me, it was Cat Stevens, and that was huge for us. I told him that last night.

How did he reply?

He said, “You know, I’m so glad you told me that. Because how would I know? How would I know?” And he goes, “I’m thrilled that I influenced the two people in Fleetwood Mac. I’m thrilled to know that.” And he was so sweet and gentle and loving and nice.

So tonight, when he started singing, I was gonna go out there and stand on the side of the stage and watch. I started crying. I couldn’t do it because if you start to cry, you can’t sing. So I had to walk away. I thought, “I’ll watch it on HBO, because if I go out there, I will get hysterical.” He’s amazing.

I think that he should come back, because I think that somebody like Cat Stevens or Yusuf – whichever name he chooses to go by – I think his message of peace and love is great. And I think that it showed very much in that huge audience tonight that his music can promote peace and love, and he should do it because he can. And he can break hearts and he can make people listen to him. And that is magical. And he should do it. And I told him that.

Who else are you excited to see tonight?

I cannot miss Hall & Oates, because Hall & Oates are huge, huge, huge for me. I really just wanted to be an R&B singer, let’s face it.

What were your thoughts on the Kiss situation? Did you talk to them at all about performing?

I did not. I just gave them kisses. No, my opinion was that they should have played. When we were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Lindsey’s a little bit like, “OK, whatever.” But let me tell you, when we walked up there and we were inducted, we stood up there and it is a moment like no other. Then you get to go and strum on your guitar and get your microphone and sing two or three songs to that audience on your day.

It is their loss that they didn’t play, because the Kiss Army is out there, right now screaming for them. And they should have played for them, no matter how they felt about it. You know, Fleetwood Mac had about 500 people in it, too. They weren’t all there. All 900 guitar players didn’t get inducted. They weren’t there. So the thing is, you know what? It’s your moment. Take it. Go out there and play. It’s the most important part. I like Kiss very much, and I think that they have done amazing. They’re an amazing band.

Additional Reporting by Patrick Doyle

Kory Grow & Patrick Doyle / Rolling Stone / Friday, April 11, 2014

VIDEOS: Stevie Nicks, all-star lineup pay tribute to RRHoF inductee Linda Ronstadt

Bonnie Raitt, Stevie Nicks, Sheryl Crow, Carrie Underwood, and others pay tribute to Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Linda Ronstadt. (Photo: Frank Posillico)
Bonnie Raitt, Stevie Nicks, Sheryl Crow, Carrie Underwood, and others pay tribute to Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Linda Ronstadt. (Photo: Frank Posillico)

Stevie attended the 29th annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on Thursday night. She joined an all-star cast of musicians to pay tribute to the great Linda Ronstadt, one of this year’s inductees.

Stevie took the lead on Ronstadt’s 1977 hit “It’s So Easy,” while her “backup supergroup” consisting of Sheryl Crow, Glenn Frey, Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt, and Carrie Underwood sang along.

Stevie said that hearing the song (which was originally recorded by Buddy Holly in 1958) in high school inspired her to be a singer.

Afflicted with Parkinson’s disease, Linda Ronstadt chose not attend the ceremony.

Linda Ronstadt Tribute Set List

  1. Different Drum (Carrie Underwood)
  2. Blue Bayou (Bonnie Raitt & Emmylou Harris)
  3. You’re No Good (Sheryl Crow & Glenn Frey)
  4. It’s So Easy (Sheryl Crow, Glenn Frey, Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt, Carrie Underwood, and Stevie Nicks on lead vocals)
  5. When Will I Be Loved (Sheryl Crow, Emmylou, Harris, Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, and Carrie Underwood)

The New York Daily News provided a live blog and posted videos clips from the induction ceremony. The full show will air May 31 on HBO.

It’s So Easy (courtesy of Cool Hand 62)

It’s So Easy (courtesy of Adam Edelman)

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When Will I Be Loved

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Photo Gallery

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Photos courtesy of Barclays Center, HBO, Rolling Stone, Scott Kropa, Kabir Bhatia, and Frank Posillico

TONIGHT: Stevie honors Linda Ronstadt at RRHoF induction ceremony

2014-0410-rrhf-induction-ceremony

Stevie will be honoring the great Linda Ronstadt at the 29th annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony tonight at Barclays Center in New York. She will be paying musical tribute to the 11-time-Grammy-Award-winning artist, singing a selection of her most famous songs. Ronstadt will not be present at the event because of her Parkinson’s disease condition, which makes travel difficult for her.

The 2014 inductees are The E Street Band, Brian Epstein, Peter Gabriel, Daryl Hall and John Oates, Kiss, Nirvana, Andrew Loog Oldham, Linda Ronstadt, and Cat Stevens. The event will be filmed, and the television broadcast will premiere on HBO on May 31.

Stevie Nicks to salute 2014 RRHoF inductee Linda Ronstadt

Ten-time Grammy-winning singer Linda Ronstadt will be saluted at the 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony by Steve Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris, Sheryl Crow and Carrie Underwood on April 10 in Brooklyn, N.Y. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
Ten-time Grammy-winning singer Linda Ronstadt will be saluted at the 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony by Steve Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris, Sheryl Crow and Carrie Underwood on April 10 in Brooklyn, N.Y. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris, Sheryl Crow and Carrie Underwood will come together to salute Linda Ronstadt upon her induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on April 10 in New York, while Bruce Springsteen, Glenn Frey, Questlove, Coldplay’s Chris Martin, Michael Stipe and Tom Morello will be among the performers and presenters on hand to welcome in the other 2014 inductees.

Those will include Peter Gabriel, Nirvana, Yusuf (formerly Cat Stevens), KISS, Daryl Hall & John Oates, the E Street Band, Beatles manager Brian Epstein and Rolling Stones manager and producer Andrew Loog Oldham.

Ronstadt, citing health issues related to her Parkinson’s disease, will not attend the event and is among three of this year’s Rock Hall class not scheduled to perform.

“It’s something I never gave one thought to,” Ronstadt told The Times last week. “It wasn’t on my radar screen. Other people seemed to be way more interested in it than I am. It’s like other awards that have come my way: I’m delighted to get them and I’ve very grateful, but I didn’t work in music for that reason.” She revealed last year that Parkinson’s had rendered her unable to sing.

KISS also has opted not to play because of a disagreement with Rock Hall officials over which band members would be inducted, and Nirvana, which will be inducted by R.E.M. singer Stipe, also is not slated to perform absent lead singer Kurt Cobain, who died in 1994.

Gabriel, Yusuf, Hall & Oates, and the E Street Band will play at the ceremony, being held this year for the first time in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center sports arena.

Martin has been tapped to induct Gabriel, the Roots’ Questlove is inducting Hall & Oates, Rage Against the Machine/Nightwatchman singer-songwriter-guitarist Morello will do the honors for KISS and Frey, who worked as a backup singer for Ronstadt before he and Don Henley broke out of her band to form the Eagles, will handle the welcoming speech for their former boss. It has not been announced who will induct Yusuf.

Highlights from this year’s event are scheduled to be cablecast at 9 p.m. Pacific and Eastern time on May 31 on HBO.

Randy Lewis / Los Angeles Times / Monday, March 31, 2014

Random Notes: Rock & Roll of Fame 20th Anniversary

Stevie Nicks appears on page 25 of the April 7th issue of Rolling Stone (RS 971), “Random Notes: Rock & Roll of Fame 20th Anniversary.” Nicks is pictured with Chrissie Hynde at the induction ceremony dinner. Similar images are available at WireImage.com.

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame press Q&A published

Here is a transcription excerpt of Stevie Nicks’ and Mick Fleetwood’s Q&A session that took place in the press room at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on March 14, 2005. In the interview, Nicks and Fleetwood answered questions about the recent Say You Will tour and the future of Fleetwood Mac.

Nicks also revealed details about her upcoming appearance at the Ceasar’s Palace Colosseum in Las Vegas this May.

Photos from 20th annual R&R HoF induction ceremony

Here are a collection of photos from 20th Annual Rock and Roll Induction Ceremony, held at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York on March 14, 2005. All photos courtesy of Jennifer Graylock/AP Photo.

Artists are eligible to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25 years after the release of their first recording. Stevie Nicks will be eligible to be inducted as a solo artist in 2006, which marks the 25th anniversary of the release of Bella Donna, Nicks’ first solo recording. Nicks was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall Fame with Fleetwood Mac in 1998.