Stevie Nicks, others to honor Tom Petty at MusiCare gala

Stevie Nicks will be among many performers honoring Tom Petty at the upcoming 2017 MusiCare Person of the Year gala. The star-studded event will be held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, on February 10, 2017 — two days before the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards®.

Stevie and Tom have been close friends for nearly 40 years, collaborating often in the studio and on tour. Stevie’s hit duet “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” with Tom remains her highest-charting single on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, reaching No. 3 in the summer of 1981. The pair also reached No. 37 on the same chart in the fall of 1985 with their cover of Jackie DeShannon’s 1963 song “Needles and Pins” (which appears on Petty’s Pack Up the Plantation: Live! album).

The full press release describing the 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year gala event appears below.

59th Annual Grammy Awards

2017 MusiCares Person of the Year: Tom Petty

THREE-TIME GRAMMY WINNER TOM PETTY TO BE HONORED AS 2017 MUSICARES® PERSON OF THE YEAR AT 27TH ANNUAL TRIBUTE

Annual Gala Benefiting the MusiCares Foundation® and its Vital Safety Net of Health and Human Services Programs for Music People will be held During GRAMMY® Week on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017

SANTA MONICA, Calif. (Sept. 28, 2016)Tom Petty will be honored as the 2017 MusiCares® Person of the Year on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, it was announced today by Neil Portnow, President/CEO of the MusiCares Foundation® and The Recording Academy®, and Alexandra Patsavas, Chair of the MusiCares Foundation Board. Proceeds from the 27th annual benefit gala dinner and concert—to be held in Los Angeles during GRAMMY® Week two nights prior to the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards®—will provide essential support for MusiCares, which ensures music people have a place to turn in times of financial, medical, and personal need.

A three-time GRAMMY winner, Petty is being honored as the 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year in recognition of his significant creative accomplishments, his career-long interest in defending artists’ rights, and the charitable work he has undertaken throughout his career, which has notably focused on the homeless population in Los Angeles. Widely recognized by a younger generation of musicians as an example of what an engaged artist can accomplish in his field and beyond, Petty has come to represent the lasting possibilities of rock and roll.

“Tom burst into our musical consciousness and never let go,” said Portnow. “His brand of rock and roll benefits from a celebratory rebelliousness, infectious rhythms, and unforgettable lyrics that are incised in our imaginations. His artistic talents coupled with his quiet philanthropy make him a great MusiCares Person of the Year honoree, and we are very fortunate to have the support of our Board, past honorees, and the musical community around this special event.”

“I am so very pleased to be honored as the MusiCares Person of the Year. I have so much respect for this organization, which really does care about the people in our industry,” said Petty. “I myself know many people who MusiCares has aided in desperate situations. Again, let me say this is a true honor.”

Petty formed his first bands in Gainesville, Fla. As a college town in the ’60s, Gainesville brought with it fraternity parties, rock and roll clubs, AM radios playing the Beatles and James Brown, and a music store where you could buy equipment on credit. Forty years after releasing his first album, Petty is widely recognized as a man for whom those things Gainesville offered still matter the most. In each of his five decades as a recording artist, Petty has charted albums in the Top 5 on the Billboard 200 chart. His most recent recording with the Heartbreakers, Hypnotic Eye, entered at No. 1.

Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Petty is an artist whose approach to record making and the business itself has earned the respect of his peers, his predecessors, and the young musicians who regularly hold him as an exemplar. His collaborators have included Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Jimmy Iovine, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Rick Rubin, and Del Shannon, among others. And while his solo recordings, including 1989’s Full Moon Fever and 1994’s Wildflowers, are frequently ranked among the most important of their respective eras, Petty has always returned to the job he’s favored: fronting one of rock and roll’s most celebrated bands and bringing them enough songs for the next album.

Repeatedly confronting the inequities of the artist’s side of the industry, Petty has assumed a special place as a musician looking out for other musicians, and an artist who approaches every recording project as if it might be his best.

“Tom Petty is an icon whose incomparable artistry has provided inspiration to fans and musicians all over the world,” said Patsavas. “To honor him with this tribute is so fitting, and we certainly look forward to an exciting and extraordinary evening.”

The 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year gala will begin with a reception and silent auction offering an exclusive and unparalleled selection of luxury items, VIP experiences, and one-of-a-kind celebrity memorabilia for bidding guests. The reception and silent auction will be followed by a dinner, the award presentation and a tribute concert featuring renowned musicians. This year, for the first time, a limited number of VIP experience tables will be available for $75,000 that include: 10 seats, artist soundcheck, red carpet access, backstage access with a meet–and-greet, access to the pre-show auction, and a special VIP lounge. The MusiCares Person of the Year tribute ceremony is one of the most prestigious events held during GRAMMY Week. The celebration culminates with the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017. The telecast will be broadcast live on the CBS Television Network at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

The MusiCares Foundation offers programs and services to members of the music community, including emergency financial assistance for basic living expenses such as rent, utilities, and car payments; medical expenses including doctor, dentist, and hospital bills; psychotherapy; and treatment for HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, hepatitis C, and other critical illnesses. MusiCares offers nationwide educational workshops covering a variety of subjects, including financial, legal, medical, and substance abuse issues, and programs in collaboration with health care professionals that provide services such as flu shots, hearing tests, and medical/dental screenings. The MusiCares MAP Fund® allows access to addiction recovery treatment and sober living resources for members of the music community. Staffed by qualified chemical dependency and intervention specialists, MusiCares offers Safe Harbor Room® support, sponsored in part by the Bohemian Foundation and RBC Capital Markets, to provide a network to those in recovery while they are participating in the production of televised music shows and other major music events. MusiCares holds weekly addiction support groups for people to discuss how to best cope with the issues surrounding the recovery process. The MusiCares Sober Touring Network is a database of individuals across the United States who can take music people to recovery support meetings while on the road.

Established in 1989 by The Recording Academy, MusiCares provides a safety net of critical assistance for music people in times of need. MusiCares’ services and resources cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies, and each case is treated with integrity and confidentiality. MusiCares also focuses the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community. For more information, please visit www.musicares.org. For breaking news and exclusive content, please “like” MusiCares on Facebook, follow @MusiCares on Twitter and Instagram.

Established in 1957, The Recording Academy is an organization of musicians, songwriters, producers, engineers, and recording professionals dedicated to improving the cultural condition and quality of life for music and its makers. Internationally known for the GRAMMY Awards—the preeminent peer-recognized award for musical excellence and the most credible brand in music—The Recording Academy is responsible for groundbreaking professional development, cultural enrichment, advocacy, education, and human services programs. The Academy continues to focus on its mission of recognizing musical excellence, advocating for the well-being of music makers, and ensuring music remains an indelible part of our culture. For more information about The Academy, please visit www.grammy.com. For breaking news and exclusive content, follow @TheGRAMMYs on Twitter, “like” The GRAMMYs on Facebook and join The GRAMMYs’ social communities on Google+, Instagram, Tumblr, and YouTube.

For information on purchasing tables and tickets to the event, please contact Dana Tomarken at MusiCares, 310.392.3777.

For reservations, click here.

‘The White Album’ inducted into Grammy Hall of Fame

Fleetwood Mac’s eponymous 1975 album, known as “The White Album,” has been inducted in the Recording Academy’s Grammy Hall of Fame in 2016, according to Billboard Magazine. Released on July 11, 1975, Fleetwood Mac was the first album in the band’s eight-year history to feature guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and singer Stevie Nicks, who joined in December 1974. Taking almost a full year to reach No. 1 on the Billboard 200 Albums chart, Fleetwood Mac produced the popular singles “Over My Head” (#20), “Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win)” (#11), and “Say You Love” (#11) — the first U.S. Top 40 singles for the English/American band. The sleeper hit has since sold more than five million copies in the U.S., and 10 million copies worldwide.

February 23, 1978: Rumours wins Grammy for Album of the Year

1978-fm-grammy-album-of-year

20th Annual GRAMMY Awards
Feb. 23, 1978

Album Of The Year

Winner: Fleetwood Mac, Rumours
Eagles, Hotel California
Steely Dan, Aja
James Taylor, JT
John Williams, Star Wars — Motion Picture Soundtrack

In a race between five albums that climbed the top of the Billboard 200 in 1977, Fleetwood Mac took home Album Of The Year gold as the Grammys turned 20. Rumours soared to No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and garnered the group two additional nominations in 1977, including Best Arrangement For Voices for “Go Your Own Way.” Fellow West Coasters the Eagles and Steely Dan also gained nods — the latter would win for Album Of The Year for Two Against Nature in 2001. Taylor didn’t leave empty-handed that year as his cover of Jimmy Jones’ 1959 “Handy Man,” from JT, won for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male. The force was with Williams, who garnered his first award two years prior for the soundtrack to Jaws and has won an impressive 21 Grammys to date.

Grammy.com

Taylor Swift gets mixed reviews at Grammys

Tennessean
Monday, February 1, 2010

The good news: At 20, Taylor Swift has become the youngest-ever recording artist to win Grammy’s biggest prize, Album of the Year. She is now the only Nashville performer to win that prize with a solo album.

“Nashville is my favorite place in the world and to see it recognized in such a beautiful way makes me so happy,” Swift said backstage late Sunday night after being told that her big win came on the same night that Kings of Leon notched Nashville rock’s first best record win.

In all, Swift won four trophies at Sunday’s 52nd Annual Grammy Awards. After Fearless also won for Best Country Album, the singer-songwriter said, “I’m standing here accepting an impossible dream right now and I thank you so much for that.”

Now the bad news: The responses to that duet with Fleetwood Mac’s Steve Nicks have been harsh.

The genre-blending duet — on Nicks’ “Rhiannon” with Swift’s “You Belong With Me” — drew sharp reviews from critics, both professional and in the social networking and blogging world.

Ann Powers of the Los Angeles Times wrote that “Swift gave a strikingly bad vocal performance at Staples Center on Sunday, sounding tinny and rhythmically flat-footed as she shared the microphone with the distinctive Stevie Nicks.”

Chris Richards of The Washington Post wrote a piece that started with “A night in the charmed life of Taylor Swift: Give an incredibly wretched vocal performance, go on to win the biggest Grammy of 2010, anyway.”

The Tennessean’s Dave Paulson chimed in on a live blog: “Maybe a smidge of Jamie Foxx’s autotune wouldn’t be such a bad idea for this duet.”

Respected music industry blogger Bob Lefsetz first wrote that Fearless deserved to win album of the year, but then proffered that Swift might have single-handledly imperiled her career with this one Grammy performance: “How awful was she? Dreadful.”

Scott Borchetta, president and CEO of Swift’s record label Big Machine Records, had this response late Monday night.

“The facts say she is the undisputed best communicator that we’ve got,” Borchetta said. “So when she says something or feels something it affects more people than anybody else. Maybe she’s not the best technical singer, but she is the best emotional singer. Everybody gets up there and is technically perfect people don’t seem to want more of it. There’s not an artist in any other format that people want more of than they want of Taylor. I think (the critics) are missing the whole voice of a generation that is happening right in front of them. Maybe they are jealous or can’t understand that. But obviously the people that she talks to are engaged with her. No one is perfect on any given day. Maybe in that moment we didn’t have the best night, but in the same breath, maybe we did.”

A midday release announcing Swift’s awards noted that immediately after the Sunday show, Swift and her band “left for LAX, headed to Australia and Japan, where she will perform several sold-out shows before returning to the States to launch her Fearless 2010 tour March 4th in Tampa.”

Stevie Nicks glad to just be recognized this year

Launch.com
By Bruce Simon and Neal Weiss
Thursday, February 28, 2002

A win certainly would have been nice at Wednesday’s (February 27) Grammys, but Stevie Nicks likely isn’t all that upset that she lost. Lucinda Williams won best female rock vocal performance, coming out ahead of Tori Amos, Melissa Etheridge, P.J. Harvey, and Nicks, who has never taken home a Grammy for her solo work.

Nicks told LAUNCH when she was nominated that she takes the bigger view–the nomination itself is really validation for her work, and it means that people still care enough about her art for her to continue creating it. “Well, it means you can still work, you know, and that’s the great thing,” she said. “Because if I didn’t do this, what would I do, you know? This is my job, this is my life, so the fact that I can still work and do this is terrific.”

Nicks and her Fleetwood Mac bandmates — drummer Mick Fleetwood, bassist John McVie, and singer-guitarist Lindsey Buckingham — are readying a new studio album for release later this year, and they will support the set with a full tour.