Rock n’ Rollers lunch with soldiers at Fort Myer

Lunch time diners at the Fort Myer dining facility yesterday may have been surprised to see two Rock legends meeting and greeting people in a back room. A line of Soldiers waited patiently for a chance to greet two visitors to the post.

Stevie Nicks and Mick Fleetwood, who first rose to prominence with the band, Fleetwood Mac, in the 1970s, were in town to visit wounded personnel at local military hospitals. The two musicians dined with a group of wounded Soldiers from Walter Reed before repairing to the community center to greet and sign autographs for more Soldiers and some family members.

By Dennis Ryan
Pentagram
Friday, December 2, 2005

Lunch time diners at the Fort Myer dining facility yesterday may have been surprised to see two Rock legends meeting and greeting people in a back room. A line of Soldiers waited patiently for a chance to greet two visitors to the post.

Stevie Nicks and Mick Fleetwood, who first rose to prominence with the band, Fleetwood Mac, in the 1970s, were in town to visit wounded personnel at local military hospitals. The two musicians dined with a group of wounded Soldiers from Walter Reed before repairing to the community center to greet and sign autographs for more Soldiers and some family members.

Nicks and Fleetwood visited Bethesda yesterday and were as excited to greet the Soldiers from Walter Reed as they were to see them.

“It was incredible,” Nicks said of her fourth visit to the wounded in Washington. “It’s always an eye-opener. They are amazing men.”

“First visit,” Fleetwood said of his trip to Bethesda. “It’s awe inspiring in terms of the people, not just the patients. We were with Marines yesterday. You get an incredible story line going on out on the floor. It’s quite astonishing. They have a truly extended family.”

Nicks also praised the hospitals’ staff for keeping up the patients’ morale after their families return home.

Fleetwood was impressed with the wounded warriors’ feeling for their deployed comrades.

“They’ve stayed in touch with their friends,” he said. “A lot of the chaps were terribly concerned with those left behind.”

Sgt. Steve Cobb was the envy of many when Nicks reached over and greeted him with a kiss. He was meeting the singer for the third time.

“I love Stevie,” Cobb said. “I’ve followed Fleetwood Mac since I was growing up.”

Staff Sgt. Lisa Kirk brought her own marker and guitar to be signed.

“I’ve followed them all my life growing up,” she said. “I saw them in Concert in Philadelphia with Crosby, Stills and Nash. I’ve been playing guitar off and on since 1992.”

Fleetwood changing diapers, still rocking at 55

Reuters
Monday, Jun 24 2002

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Drummer Mick Fleetwood, who turned 55 Monday, finds himself in the odd position of changing diapers at middle age even as he toils in the studio with members of the veteran rock band he co-founded in the late 1960s. The tall, lanky, British-born musician divides his time these days between working on a new Fleetwood Mac album, dabbling in various entrepreneurial activities and raising twin baby girls with his wife of about 10 years, Lynn.

During a telephone interview, Fleetwood told Reuters that both his creative and parenting skills had improved with age.

He also said he and his fellow bandmates are more at peace with themselves and each other, in stark contrast to the old days when Fleetwood Mac endured bitter internal rivalries and turmoil as the group churned out hit after hit.

“Our last outing was better than ever,” he said, referring to Fleetwood Mac’s 1997 reunion album, “The Dance,” which sold more than 4 million copies in the United States and paved the way for a successful U.S. tour.

“It has to be happy. We don’t want to go back into the dark ages of Fleetwood Mac, when it was way too crazy, not all that happy. We’re so much over that. We came out on the other side, survivors and incredibly intact, and it’s very conducive to the creative process,” he said.

The new album reunites Fleetwood with three members of the band’s most popular incarnation — bass player and British co-founder John McVie, along with American songwriters and former lovers Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. Sitting this one out is McVie’s ex-wife, singer-keyboardist Christine McVie, who has retired and is living in England.

DON’T STOP

The band, which shot to fame in the 1970s at the peak of its progression from British blues combo to California rock institution, has already produced enough material in the past 18 months to fill a double CD, Fleetwood said. The material was recorded in a Los Angeles house leased by the band.

Fleetwood expects the band to have the album out by early next year and to follow up with a tour in April 2003. The band also is releasing a greatest hits package around Christmas 2002, he said.

Fleetwood said there are “mumblings” from time to time of contributions by Christine McVie, but that the remaining four members have been moving ahead at full steam. In some ways, he said, the Buckingham/Nicks creative connection has been rekindled in the absence of Christine McVie.

“It’s a major thing for Stevie and Lindsey. They came in as a couple, and in a strange way it’s come full circle. Now that Christine is not in the mix, the Buckingham/Nicks chemistry is back, and they’re having the chance to live out some of the things and energies that couldn’t exist in the past 27 years,” he said.

The band has changed its lineup many times through the years, with the best-known formula occurring in 1975 when Buckingham and Nicks joined Fleetwood and the McVies. They powered the band to mega-success with the 1977 album “Rumours,” which sold more than 25 million copies worldwide.

“Rumours” chronicled the band’s dramas at the time, with both the McVies and Buckingham and Nicks splitting up.

Fleetwood’s own wife at the time was sleeping with his best friend, and the whole band struggled with drug and alcohol abuse problems.

Fleetwood, who has two grown daughters as well as a grandson, is now back to putting diapers on his 4-month-old twins, Tessa and Ruby.

He said that being an older dad has definite advantages.

“It’s way more interesting the second time around and when you’re older. You’re more focused,” he said. “I was on the road when the others were younger. I am from memory a lot more hands on than I was. And it’s a great benefit that I’m not on the road.”

Of course, next year could be different when he plans to take the band back on the road, with the families in tow.

“With all the children, it will be like a band of gypsies,” he said, joking that he expected everyone will want the babies and nannies “way in the back of the plane.”

Nicks gets by with a lotta help from her friends

By Cathalena E. Burch
Arizona Daily Star
Friday, December 7, 2001

PHOENIX — Stevie Nicks’ waited until taking her final bow before choking back a tear that was welling for the better part of her 2 1/2-hour show Thursday night.

“Take care of each other and be good to each other. Life is so fragile,” she said, referring to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York.

The 9,000 people loosely filling Nicks’ hometown arena cheered in support and allowed their favorite daughter a moment of emotional indulgence.

They owed her that much for helping them to forgot about the attacks, the war on terrorism and much else to do about the world outside of America West Arena.

Nicks and a few of her friends took the audience back to the cold war 1980s, before anyone had really heard of a madman named Osama bin Laden.

Thursday night’s show was a fund-raiser for the Arizona Heart Institute Foundation. But with the exception of State Attorney General Janet Napolitano and a suit-clad foundation official saying a few words, you never would have known that the evening was dedicated to such warm-and-fuzzy pursuits.

The audience came to see the legendary Nicks and her enviable cast of friends — Mick Fleetwood, Lindsey Buckingham, Don Henley, Sheryl Crow and Natalie Maines.

From the opening chords of “Stop Dragging My Heart Around,” Nicks turned back the clock 20 years, to the days when her ethereal, mystical voice ruled the radio.

Not daunted by age or the ever changing pop music landscape, she sounded and looked just as she had back then, sans the after-effects of heavy partying. She swirled, she twirled, she bent down in that swoop and turn that made everyone want to be a gypsy like her.

Granted, she didn’t bend as low as she did in her youth, but the magic was just as tangible.

And infectious.

Nicks barely uttered the first words of “Stand Back” when the crowd took over, their chorus overflowing the arena. They boldly and loudly sang along to every song she performed: “Edge of Seventeen,” “Rhiannon,” “Gold Dust Woman,” “Enchanted.”

One by one she invited each of her special friends to share the mike on a song that forever ties them to Nicks: Henley on “Leather and Lace,” Maines on “Too Far From Texas,” Crow on “Sorcerer” and Buckingham on the classic “Landslide,” a song the pair dedicated to Nicks’ father, Jess.

As Buckingham picked the intricate notes on his guitar, Nicks let the words slip out like lines of poetry, softly and packed with the emotional weight they’ve carried since she penned the song 30 years ago.

The pair share a musical bond that can’t be broken, which could explain why they and their Fleetwood Mac bandmates, sans Christy McVie, are in the studio now recording a new album.

Nicks is forging new but seemingly just as solid bonds with her newest friends, Crow and Maines. She gushed over both women, crediting Crow with the very existence of her latest album, “Trouble in Shangri-La.” She said that after two days in the studio with Maines, she felt as if they pair had been performing together a lifetime.

Nicks also let her friends hog the spotlight individually, which gave Henley a chance to resurrect two of his classics: “End of the Innocence” and “Boys of Summer.” Buckingham jammed on the guitar and then invited Fleetwood to bang on the drums for a number.

But the applause was most deafening when Nicks was solo, spinning a tale of a “Gold Dust Woman” or asking the question “Has Anyone Ever Written Anything For You,” not anticipating an answer.

The crowd answered back by singing along.

For a little while, Sept. 11 and all that has come after it didn’t exist, and the tears that Stevie Nicks was holding back could just as easily have been tears of joy.