Stevie Nicks to join Tom Petty at Hyde Park gig

StevieNicksOfficial has confirmed that Stevie Nicks will be joining Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers at British Summer Time Hyde Park on Sunday, July 9, 2017. It will be Petty’s only European performance next year. Tickets go on sale this Friday, December 16.

London! Stevie will be joining & the Heartbreakers on Sun 9th July 2017. Don’t miss it! Tickets go on sale Fri at 9.

Stevie Nicks, others to honor Tom Petty at MusiCare gala

Stevie Nicks will be among many performers honoring Tom Petty at the upcoming 2017 MusiCare Person of the Year gala. The star-studded event will be held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, on February 10, 2017 — two days before the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards®.

Stevie and Tom have been close friends for nearly 40 years, collaborating often in the studio and on tour. Stevie’s hit duet “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” with Tom remains her highest-charting single on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, reaching No. 3 in the summer of 1981. The pair also reached No. 37 on the same chart in the fall of 1985 with their cover of Jackie DeShannon’s 1963 song “Needles and Pins” (which appears on Petty’s Pack Up the Plantation: Live! album).

The full press release describing the 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year gala event appears below.

59th Annual Grammy Awards

2017 MusiCares Person of the Year: Tom Petty

THREE-TIME GRAMMY WINNER TOM PETTY TO BE HONORED AS 2017 MUSICARES® PERSON OF THE YEAR AT 27TH ANNUAL TRIBUTE

Annual Gala Benefiting the MusiCares Foundation® and its Vital Safety Net of Health and Human Services Programs for Music People will be held During GRAMMY® Week on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017

SANTA MONICA, Calif. (Sept. 28, 2016)Tom Petty will be honored as the 2017 MusiCares® Person of the Year on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, it was announced today by Neil Portnow, President/CEO of the MusiCares Foundation® and The Recording Academy®, and Alexandra Patsavas, Chair of the MusiCares Foundation Board. Proceeds from the 27th annual benefit gala dinner and concert—to be held in Los Angeles during GRAMMY® Week two nights prior to the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards®—will provide essential support for MusiCares, which ensures music people have a place to turn in times of financial, medical, and personal need.

A three-time GRAMMY winner, Petty is being honored as the 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year in recognition of his significant creative accomplishments, his career-long interest in defending artists’ rights, and the charitable work he has undertaken throughout his career, which has notably focused on the homeless population in Los Angeles. Widely recognized by a younger generation of musicians as an example of what an engaged artist can accomplish in his field and beyond, Petty has come to represent the lasting possibilities of rock and roll.

“Tom burst into our musical consciousness and never let go,” said Portnow. “His brand of rock and roll benefits from a celebratory rebelliousness, infectious rhythms, and unforgettable lyrics that are incised in our imaginations. His artistic talents coupled with his quiet philanthropy make him a great MusiCares Person of the Year honoree, and we are very fortunate to have the support of our Board, past honorees, and the musical community around this special event.”

“I am so very pleased to be honored as the MusiCares Person of the Year. I have so much respect for this organization, which really does care about the people in our industry,” said Petty. “I myself know many people who MusiCares has aided in desperate situations. Again, let me say this is a true honor.”

Petty formed his first bands in Gainesville, Fla. As a college town in the ’60s, Gainesville brought with it fraternity parties, rock and roll clubs, AM radios playing the Beatles and James Brown, and a music store where you could buy equipment on credit. Forty years after releasing his first album, Petty is widely recognized as a man for whom those things Gainesville offered still matter the most. In each of his five decades as a recording artist, Petty has charted albums in the Top 5 on the Billboard 200 chart. His most recent recording with the Heartbreakers, Hypnotic Eye, entered at No. 1.

Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Petty is an artist whose approach to record making and the business itself has earned the respect of his peers, his predecessors, and the young musicians who regularly hold him as an exemplar. His collaborators have included Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Jimmy Iovine, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Rick Rubin, and Del Shannon, among others. And while his solo recordings, including 1989’s Full Moon Fever and 1994’s Wildflowers, are frequently ranked among the most important of their respective eras, Petty has always returned to the job he’s favored: fronting one of rock and roll’s most celebrated bands and bringing them enough songs for the next album.

Repeatedly confronting the inequities of the artist’s side of the industry, Petty has assumed a special place as a musician looking out for other musicians, and an artist who approaches every recording project as if it might be his best.

“Tom Petty is an icon whose incomparable artistry has provided inspiration to fans and musicians all over the world,” said Patsavas. “To honor him with this tribute is so fitting, and we certainly look forward to an exciting and extraordinary evening.”

The 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year gala will begin with a reception and silent auction offering an exclusive and unparalleled selection of luxury items, VIP experiences, and one-of-a-kind celebrity memorabilia for bidding guests. The reception and silent auction will be followed by a dinner, the award presentation and a tribute concert featuring renowned musicians. This year, for the first time, a limited number of VIP experience tables will be available for $75,000 that include: 10 seats, artist soundcheck, red carpet access, backstage access with a meet–and-greet, access to the pre-show auction, and a special VIP lounge. The MusiCares Person of the Year tribute ceremony is one of the most prestigious events held during GRAMMY Week. The celebration culminates with the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017. The telecast will be broadcast live on the CBS Television Network at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

The MusiCares Foundation offers programs and services to members of the music community, including emergency financial assistance for basic living expenses such as rent, utilities, and car payments; medical expenses including doctor, dentist, and hospital bills; psychotherapy; and treatment for HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, hepatitis C, and other critical illnesses. MusiCares offers nationwide educational workshops covering a variety of subjects, including financial, legal, medical, and substance abuse issues, and programs in collaboration with health care professionals that provide services such as flu shots, hearing tests, and medical/dental screenings. The MusiCares MAP Fund® allows access to addiction recovery treatment and sober living resources for members of the music community. Staffed by qualified chemical dependency and intervention specialists, MusiCares offers Safe Harbor Room® support, sponsored in part by the Bohemian Foundation and RBC Capital Markets, to provide a network to those in recovery while they are participating in the production of televised music shows and other major music events. MusiCares holds weekly addiction support groups for people to discuss how to best cope with the issues surrounding the recovery process. The MusiCares Sober Touring Network is a database of individuals across the United States who can take music people to recovery support meetings while on the road.

Established in 1989 by The Recording Academy, MusiCares provides a safety net of critical assistance for music people in times of need. MusiCares’ services and resources cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies, and each case is treated with integrity and confidentiality. MusiCares also focuses the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community. For more information, please visit www.musicares.org. For breaking news and exclusive content, please “like” MusiCares on Facebook, follow @MusiCares on Twitter and Instagram.

Established in 1957, The Recording Academy is an organization of musicians, songwriters, producers, engineers, and recording professionals dedicated to improving the cultural condition and quality of life for music and its makers. Internationally known for the GRAMMY Awards—the preeminent peer-recognized award for musical excellence and the most credible brand in music—The Recording Academy is responsible for groundbreaking professional development, cultural enrichment, advocacy, education, and human services programs. The Academy continues to focus on its mission of recognizing musical excellence, advocating for the well-being of music makers, and ensuring music remains an indelible part of our culture. For more information about The Academy, please visit www.grammy.com. For breaking news and exclusive content, follow @TheGRAMMYs on Twitter, “like” The GRAMMYs on Facebook and join The GRAMMYs’ social communities on Google+, Instagram, Tumblr, and YouTube.

For information on purchasing tables and tickets to the event, please contact Dana Tomarken at MusiCares, 310.392.3777.

For reservations, click here.

Mick Fleetwood talks future of new Mac album

Mick Fleetwood says he hopes Fleetwood Mac finishes a new album ‘Before we hang it up’

Before Fleetwood Mac launched its 2014-2015 world tour, Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood worked on some new tracks that have yet to see the light of day. Fleetwood says that “before we hang it up,” he hopes the band will complete those recordings and release a new studio album, while admitting that he isn’t sure if that will happen.

“We have what we would call a large stash of great music. I’m not quite sure what we’re heading to do with it,” he tells ABC Radio. “I hope that we are able to [put an album together]. It’s just getting everyone on the same page to finish off the work that we’ve been doing.”

Mick admits that one Fleetwood Mac member who currently isn’t on the same page is Stevie Nicks, who will be launching a new North American solo tour on October 25.

“She’s busy doing her own stuff,” he points out. “And in this point in life, we’ve all dedicated so much time to Fleetwood Mac, you go, ‘Hey, it’d be great if we could, but if not, don’t worry about it.’”

Fleetwood tells ABC Radio that even if Nicks chooses not to lend her talents to the project, he hopes the music that’s already been recorded will be released in some form.

“I think there’s some thought that some of that lovely music would come out as a sort of duet album, maybe…from Christine and Lindsey,” Mick poses. “And if not, it will stay in a room, waiting for the day that maybe it would make sense that all of us can contribute to that being a Fleetwood Mac album.”

He adds, “Before we hang it up in the next few years, I truly hope there’s another lovely album that will come out.”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

10 Questions for Christine McVie of Fleetwood Mac

The peacemaker of Fleetwood Mac on Mirage, Maui, and missing the buzz

theartsdesk meets Christine McVie on a sunny Friday afternoon in September; the Warner Brothers boardroom (with generous hospitality spread) is suitably palatial. We’re the first media interview of the day, so she’s bright and attentive. McVie was always the member of Fleetwood Mac who you’d want to adopt: the most approachably human member of a band constantly at war with itself. Readily admitting that she’s the “peacekeeper” in the band, the singer/songwriter behind such Mac classics as “Everywhere” and “You Make Loving Fun” is as sweet and serene as you’d hope she would be.

She’s here to promote the new deluxe remaster of 1982 album Mirage – the follow-up three years on to the somewhat deranged Tusk, which was recorded and released as Christine and John McVie, the band’s bassist, were divorcing. She quit the band in 1998 after the hugely successful live album The Dance, after which she started a fairly solitary life of her own in the English countryside for the best part of 16 years. The first four of those, she says, were simply spent working on the house. It was only therapy and the canny, persuasive hand of Mick Fleetwood that coaxed her into returning after a trip to Maui, Hawaii, where Mick lives close to John McVie, his lifelong partner-in-crime.

The former Christine Perfect had a severe fear of flying that she’s now completely beaten, and as we speak, it’s clear that she’s fairly perplexed about having left the fray for so long in the first place. So what was she doing in all that time exactly? “A lot of people ask me that question!” With a brand new album (their first since 2001’s Say You Will) and a new world tour in the planning stages, it’s clear that the Fleetwood Mac story still has several enthralling chapters ahead. Somewhere near Fleetwood’s on Front Street – Mick’s fancy restaurant in Maui – the drummer must be feeling pretty smug that the ragged band of brothers and sisters he founded are finally back together.

RALPH MOORE: What was the mood of the band post-Tusk?

CHRISTINE McVIE: I remember we did two huge world tours after Tusk. We drove ourselves into the ground physically, and obviously there was a lot of drinking and a lot of drugs, and that just about killed us all, so we took a lot of time off. There was a long time between Tusk and Mirage. Mick went to Ghana to make an album called The Visitor and Stevie [Nicks] made Bella Donna, which was a huge hit for her.

Fleetwood MacBut I think maybe we were under contract so had to make a record at that time, so Mick tried to recreate a similar bubble to Rumours where we were away from our homes, and that’s how that started. The mood? I was quite looking forward to it. We recorded at Honky Château [the infamous Chateau d’Herouville, located 20 miles north of Paris in the Val d’Oise]. There was a big piano there that Elton John had left there, so that was great. I seem to remember we did a lot of mucking around, playing table tennis. The guys from the French Open came down to visit us and John McEnroe also came down – I think I actually beat him at table tennis one night! It was a funny time. I don’t remember any particular animosity. I’m sure we were under contract to do another record so that was the basis of it. And from that, from little acorns the oak tree grew and it turned into a much nicer experience with some really good songs on it.

You returned to the band in 2014: had the dynamic changed?

Well, I just couldn’t believe that 16 years had actually passed. I mean, quite literally, from the moment I stepped on stage in Dublin to rehearse “Don’t Stop” I knew: the eye contact with all the band members, it was like going home. Truthfully. And they felt the same about me. The circle was complete. Had anything changed? Only technically. Vibe wise, I had Mick looking at me through his cymbals, but there was always that gap there on the stage when I left – they hadn’t filled it up with anyone else. That gap when they were touring without me was there every night. It was such a great feeling.

Is it fair to say that you’re the peacekeeper in the band?

I know Stevie always calls me Mother Earth, so possibly! How do I put this…. I have always been the most sane one of the lot, more down to earth, but I think John’s probably even more down to earth now. Peacekeeper? Yeah, I like that title. I do tend to meander around in the cracks! And do I have to be a peacekeeper now? Only occasionally. You always get moments with Stevie and Lindsey [Buckingham], that’s part of their make-up – they are each other’s muses and they have not been together for years, but they have this love/hate thing that they’ll always have and someone has to gently insinuate in the middle.

But Stevie and I are really good friends, in fact I think we’re better friends now than we were 16 years ago. And it’s a fact, when it’s the Buckingham/Nicks show backed by John and Mick, that’s going to cause a lot of tension and stress. But with me in there, it gave Stevie the chance to get her breath back and not have this constant thing going on with Lindsey: her sister was back.

Is it fair to say that Fleetwood Mac is a democracy, but driven for the most part by Mick?

Yes, but you’ve got to have a degree of flexibility. We’re very democratic. If one person is outvoted, you go with it. Mick always says, I’m a drummer, I can’t just sit in a room and play drums, I need a band. So in Maui, he has his own little band and when Fleetwood Mac’s not touring, he plays with them. It keeps him busy.

(Photo: Danny Clinch)
(Photo: Danny Clinch)

In the 16 years interim, what were you doing and did you see the band much?

I didn’t see them very much. First of all, I never flew anywhere. I saw them at Earl’s Court a few years back and sat at the sound board and that was a weird feeling. But I had no sense at that time of wanting to rejoin and at that time it was a relief – but I didn’t realise what pleasure I was missing until more recent days when I made the phone call to Mick and asked, “What would be it be like if I came back?” Fortunately Stevie was dying for me to come back, as were the rest of the band. Lindsey didn’t believe it would ever happen, but when I walked back onstage he did and they were delirious.

But when I first left, I was married at that point and spent four years restoring the house, a big rambling place with gardens – it was quite a project. But I didn’t write very much and the marriage didn’t work out, and I started to find I was twiddling my thumbs in this huge place, bouncing off the walls. So I thought that I’d do a little solo project. I got together with my nephew who’s a good musician and quite handy with ProTools and I thought, I’ll do a little record because I can’t fly, and I don’t want to tour, so we did that in my garage. And that took a couple of years, because we didn’t have a pressing need to finish it.

And then I sunk into isolation and got in a bit of trouble and sought help, and that was when I called Mick. It was healing and cathartic going back into the band. I missed all that buzz. I was also deluded about some idea of being the country lady with dogs, a Range Rover and Hunter boots, going for long walks, all that. Baking cakes in my Aga. It was not what I wanted in the end.

How did you overcome the fear of flying?

I was starting to realise that I was trapped in England unless I went by train or boat – and that I will never be able to see the world. So I went to a therapist and said, “I have to be able to get on a plane.” And he said, “Where would you most like to go?” And I said, “Maui!” And he said, “Buy a first-class ticket. Don’t get on – you have the ticket, that’s the starting point.” And as serendipity would have it Mick said, “I am coming to London” and I said, “I have a ticket to Maui!” So he said “Stay there! And we’ll go back together.”

So I went back with Mick to Maui and didn’t even feel the plane taking off, that’s how unafraid I was. I had some pretty good therapy, and I love flying now! And I did some songs with his little band there, and that was the start of it all. It’s the best thing we could have ever done. In many ways, I think we sound better and the audience reaction is better than even it was before. It’s unprecedented in rock ‘n’ roll that someone should leave and rejoin 16 years on and all five of us are still alive and healthy – touch wood and whistle.

Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie
Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie work on new songs in the studio.

Let’s talk about the new album.

I love every single track we’ve done, bar none. This’s something to me that is really special. Stevie hasn’t come in on it yet because she’s been busy doing something else. Last year, I was in there with Mick and Lindsey and John – John’s healing very nicely now – and nearly completed seven tracks and they’re magic. Seriously, no padding! I’m going to go over again in October to work on it. Stevie’s on tour but we’ve got until next year to finish it because we’re planning a world tour again, for the summer of ’17. I don’t know if I’m privy to give song titles yet, but Lindsey and I have practically co-written everything. Getting the band all together is like herding sheep: to get all five of us in a room is nigh-on impossible. And then somebody will wander out. But it does happen.

Mirage is still a pretty eccentric record when you listen to it. And what’s great is Fleetwood Mac is now a genuine, cross-generational experience.

The generation gap is phenomenal! Kids are going, “We’d better see them before one of them dies!” The songs endure. I have lots of friends with growing children, even 12- and 11-year-olds and some of them are avid listeners, they carry Rumours on their iPods! Tango is a favourite and Tusk is a favourite of some the weird 14-year-old boys. The demographic is remarkable.

And you still have the potential to play Glastonbury again.

Yes. I think we have been asked but for whatever reason it hasn’t happened, I don’t know for what reason. Would I love to do it? Love’s a strong word! I wouldn’t mind – so long as we could helicopter in and helicopter out!

Fleetwood Mac Mirage (1982)Let’s end by returning to Mirage – where does it sit in the Mac canon for you?

If I have to be really truthful, it’s not catalogued as my favourite but on it are some great songs and some really good memories and it harkens in a vague sense not to the soul of Rumours but to more commercial roots after Tusk, which was the antithesis of commercial. On Mirage we made an effort to have a few more catchy songs. But it’s still a pretty eccentric record when you listen to it. It’s nuts!

The deluxe edition of Mirage is out on September 23rd on Warner Brothers.

Ralph Moore / theartsdesk (UK) / Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Stevie Nicks to appear on new Sheryl Crow album

Stevie Nicks will be singing on Sheryl Crow’s next album, due out in early 2017. Crow was the keynote speaker at #Blogher16 and revealed that she recently finished recording the album, which will be mixed in October. Willie Nelson, Keith Richards, and Citizen Cope will also be special guests on the album.

Related Article

Keith Richards, Stevie Nicks to Guest Star on Sheryl Crow’s Next Album

Sheryl Crow’s next album will have some heavy hitters on it. The rocker, 54, appeared in downtown Los Angeles on Aug. 5 at the BlogHer16 conference, where she told the crowd that after being treated for breast cancer in 2006, she has been free of the disease for 10 years. Crow, who last released an album in 2013, also told Overheard that she is in the process of recording a new album at her home studio in Nashville that is “inspired by the people who have inspired me since I was a kid.” Among the guest stars: “Stevie Nicks, who is a dear friend,” and “Keith Richards, who is an inspired and amazing human being.” Crow expects the record to be out next spring. She also is about to begin work on another album with songwriter-producer Jeff Trott, who wrote some of her biggest hits, including “My Favorite Mistake.” “If It Makes You Happy,” “Soak Up The Sun” and “Every Day Is A Winding Road.”

Selma Fonseca / Billboard / Friday, August 12, 2016

Mick Fleetwood talks Maui gallery, Fleetwood Mac’s future

“There really are dozens of songs,” drummer says of possible new studio album from ‘Rumours’ lineup

“People always say that corny thing: ‘Every picture tells a story,'” says Mick Fleetwood. “Well, they truly do! That’s what I love about them.” The 69-year-old Fleetwood, it should be noted, is certainly a fan of a good story. During a recent evening at Fleetwood’s on Front St., his restaurant and bar situated on the west Maui shoreline, the drummer regales Rolling Stone with an array of tales, from a dinner party with Willie Nelson at the island home of “supermensch” manager and agent Shep Gordon, to accompanying his daughters to a Justin Bieber concert (“He’s got some drum chops that I don’t have – a total shredder”) to a long-ago post-gig blowout in Honolulu that ended with Fleetwood, his mother and former Mac producer Richard Dashut covered in a whole lot of cake frosting – the aftermath of which is captured in a snapshot of a young Mick and mum drenched in buttercream that is hanging on a nearby wall.

Regarding his interest in photos, Fleetwood is here to discuss his newest endeavor, a partnership with the Morrison Hotel Gallery that has brought an outpost of the New York–based rock photography showroom to Maui. The new space, which opened in late June with a showing from acclaimed lens man Henry Diltz, is housed below the restaurant and adjacent to Fleetwood’s General Store (where one can purchase plenty of signed Mac memorabilia, among other items). “It makes sense to me to have it here,” Fleetwood says of the gallery. “Because it’s so connected to where I come from. Morrison Hotel is all about music.”

Fleetwood is still all about music as well. Next month the drummer will embark on a short fall tour of the west coast and Canada with the Mick Fleetwood Blues Band, a unit that revisits Fleetwood Mac material from their late-Sixties formative years with singer and guitarist Peter Green. “It’s a reminder to me of from whence I came,” he says of playing songs like “Black Magic Woman” and “Rattlesnake Shake” again. Furthermore, he revealed that Fleetwood Mac, which less than a year ago completed a mammoth world tour with the fully restored Rumours-era lineup, will indeed be hitting the road once again at some point in the future. If all goes well (and if one member in particular gets on board) there may even be a new studio album from the band, their first since 2003’s Say You Will. “We have a cartload of recorded stuff, and I’d like to see if come out,” Fleetwood says. “Truly, I think there should be an album.”

Over dinner with RS, Fleetwood discussed the new Morrison Hotel Gallery, what brought him to Maui and the future of Fleetwood Mac. Then he retreated to the restaurant’s rooftop dining area, where he chatted with guests and sat in with local band the Houseshakers, drumming along on a short set of classic blues songs. “People see me around and they say, ‘How long are you here for?'” Fleetwood remarked of his presence on the Hawaiian island. “And I tell them, ‘No, no. I live here.’ All of this — the restaurant, the store, the new gallery — it wouldn’t work otherwise. This is my home.”

What led to the opening of the Morrison Hotel Gallery here in Maui?
I had met [Morrison Hotel founder] Peter Blachley 12 years or so ago during a Mac tour down in Australia, and I thought he was a super cool guy. I didn’t even know he had this gallery. Our paths crossed a few more times, including once in New York when Morrison Hotel presented a show of Stevie’s Polaroid photos [“24 Karat Gold”], and I went to support her. And I found myself thinking, “I wonder if …” But it just went off the radar. Then, more recently, Peter was in Maui on holiday, and when he came here to Fleetwood’s he saw the whole operation we have going on, and the great art scene that surrounds us. I mean, the Hawaiian islands are one of the top three art capitals of the world. They sell more art on these islands than almost anywhere. And so I brought up this idea and he was interested. Then I said, “How about we just pony up and have you come and really do this properly?” And now we’re off and running.

 

You actually do some photography yourself.
Well, yes … but not so much. I go out and take pictures of trees and things. So it’s not quite the same [laughs]. But for a long time on the road I was a snapshot-taker that annoyed everyone. I was always taking shots in Fleetwood Mac and boring people. But now I’m the one with all the pictures, for whatever purpose that serves! But for me, it’s always been about trying to freeze a moment in time and tell a story. We had a great opening at the gallery with Henry Diltz, and a lot of his work is hanging here at the moment. He did a wonderful meet-and-greet and slide show, and one thing I noticed when Henry was giving his presentation was that he started telling stories along with his photos, and the stories were so amazing. He takes great pictures, but I have to say the stories almost eclipse the pictures. And that’s what it’s about at the gallery. All our boys and girls went to New York to get trained, because it’s all in the storytelling. I love that stuff.

“The pictures are very much triggers to a bygone generation.”

Another great thing is that the Morrison Hotel operation is all very together. They’ve been doing it for years and they have a really beautiful collage of photos that are forever. Those photographs of Henry’s that are downstairs? They’re never going to go out of style. And why would they? You’re looking at the outtakes of a shoot of the first Crosby, Stills & Nash album. It’s storytelling of some mythological proportions, really. The pictures are very much triggers to a bygone generation. And people want to see that. Half the people who come to see Fleetwood Mac now are 20, 30 years old. And they come because there’s a story to be told. That’s the fascination. People go, “What’s this all about?”

Are there plans to launch additional shows similar to the Henry Diltz exhibit?
Oh, yes. We’re planning on having other photographers come in. Neal Preston is one of our featured photographers. I’m hoping that Pattie Boyd comes. I’m visualizing Stevie coming. And we’re going to rotate in some local talent that I think is worth a damn. Because the idea is also to support the scene. On an island, that’s what you should do. And it’s what I enjoy doing. I don’t know what it’s called, but it’s similar to some of the things I did in Fleetwood Mac — get a stage and find some lovely, incredible people to put on it.

 

How long have you been on Maui?
Actively, about 16 years. And for about seven years before that I’d be here half the year. I came here after we finished the Fleetwood Mac album with Stevie and Lindsey [Buckingham]. The reason was, this is where [producer] Keith Olsen had taken them when they had finished their Buckingham Nicks album [in 1973]. The Napili Kai hotel, to be exact. So then when we finished the Fleetwood Mac album they said “Why don’t we go?” And that’s when I fell in love with Maui. John [McVie] did too. And actually, the house I have in Napili is one I had originally turned John onto. He owned it for 30 years and then sold it back to me. And Stevie used to come out and spend weeks here. So there’s a lot of Mac history flying around the island.

As far as Fleetwood Mac is concerned, you guys wrapped up a world tour – your first in more than a decade with Christine McVie back in the fold – a little less than a year ago. What does the future hold for the band?
Well, we’re all dedicated to getting together about a year or so from now and going and doing another two years of touring all over the world, probably. And we also have a huge amount of recorded music. A huge amount. None of it’s with Stevie. Or very little. Some of it is very, very old stuff that Lindsey maybe did with her years and years ago. We’re not quite sure what will happen with it. But you know, doing this band is a huge investment. We’re only off the road for less than a year, and when you add in the time it takes to put a tour together, do rehearsals, get it up and running, the whole thing, it’s three years that you don’t do anything else. And Stevie has her own life and career and I think … you know, she just doesn’t want to spend the time right now. And we’re quietly saddened about that but also I sort of understand.

Do you think there will be a new record?
I really don’t know. The hope was that there was going to be. I do know that when Christine came back, she came back with a bag full of goods. She fucking wrote up a storm. She and Lindsey could probably have a mighty strong duet album if they want. In truth I hope it will come to more than that.

So nothing’s planned … but it could happen.
There’s always a “could happen” [laughs]. But one thing that’s for sure — there really are dozens of songs. And they’re really good. And so you think, “Shit, I don’t want it to be that, decades later, when we’re all pushing up daisies, someone hears this stuff and goes, ‘Well, that should have come out!'” So we’ll see.

Richard Bienstock / Rolling Stone / Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Inside the making of Destiny’s Child’s ‘Bootylicious’ 15 years later

The story behind the jelly from some of the track’s key players

Destiny's Child
Destiny’s Child

It’s been 15 years since Destiny’s Child recorded “Bootylicious,” the Billboard No. 1 single that sampled the guitar riff from Stevie’s 1981 classic “Edge of Seventeen.” The track went on to sell 485,000 units to date, with more than 36.7 million online streams and a radio audience of 974 million, according to Nielsen Soundscan. The key sample proved to be a goldmine for Nicks, who received 50% of the songwriting royalties. Here’s a look back on the song and the making of its music video (see the video clip at the bottom of the page).

Before 2001, the term “Bootylicious” was mostly associated with Snoop Dogg, who so eloquently combined the words “booty” and “delicious” on his verse in Dr. Dre’s “F— Wit Dre Day” in 1993. But that all changed when Beyoncé Knowles, Kelly Rowland, and Michelle Williams started working on Survivor, Destiny’s Child’s third album that would cement them as one of the decade’s best pop trios.

By May 2001, they had reclaimed the word “Bootylicious” on one of the album’s touchstone tracks that featured the phrase “I don’t think you ready for this jelly” and a Stevie Nicks’ guitar sample. Fifteen years after it was released on May 20, 2001, some of the track’s key players remember how it all went down.

“I had this track that had a Stevie Nicks’ [1981 hit “Edge of Seventeen”] guitar loop on it,” producer Rob Fusari, who has since worked closely with Lady Gaga, told EW in an interview earlier this year. He said hip-hop group Bell Biv Devoe wanted the song, but he gave it to Destiny’s Child’s manager and Beyoncé’s father, Mathew Knowles, instead.

Once they agreed to use it, Fusari and Beyoncé began “talking about lyrics and concepts back and forth over the phone,” he said. “She was out of the country at that point, but she had the ‘Bootylicious’ concept in her head. That was totally her. She knew what she wanted to say. It was very urban pop angle that they were taking on the record.”

The group recorded the song in Houston, Texas at SugarHill Studios, where they had worked for years. “We cut ‘Bootylicious’ in one 14-hour day,” SugarHill’s president Dan Workman, who worked as an engineer on the album, said. “Beyoncé was sitting sideways on the effects rack behind me in the studio and we’d play her the track over and over while she wrote. We wrote the song in one sitting right there in the studio, and she and Kelly would tap each other in singing the parts and figure it all out.

“I remember Mathew calling me that day asking what we did and I said, ‘Well we did a song called “Bootylicious” and the phone was just silent on the other end, he was like “Bootylicious”?! Oh no no no!’ I was like, ‘No you don’t understand. It’s this great female empowerment song it’s going to be fantastic.’ Sure enough it was on the radio within a few months and it was very thrilling to see that happen.”

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But Mathew Knowles went back and forth with Fusari about the track, debating whether to pull out the Nicks sample, which proved to be a fiscal splurge. “Initially the loop I wanted in the track was from ‘Eye of the Tiger’ which is the same riff,” Fusari said. “I didn’t have the vinyl to handle it, but I did have the Stevie Nicks record. Needless to say, Mathew was adamant about not replacing that loop because I knew it was going to come with a significant sample fee and a copyright that Stevie Nicks would want and sure enough it did. It was 50 percent of everything. He said, ‘The record’s perfect the way it is,’ so I didn’t get to change that. We kind of had a pissing match in terms of what the record needed.”

The sample worked to their advantage when the iconic Fleetwood Mac singer made a cameo in the “Bootylicious” music video, directed by Matthew Rolston. Nicks plays herself in a dressing room, strapped with a glittery guitar and magenta flared pants.

“Putting [Nicks] in the video… I don’t know what better way to put it than it’s woman-centric positioning,” said the album’s mixer Tony Maserati. “It’s super smart.”

Fans and critics agreed when the track hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song went on to sell 485,000 units to date, has been streamed more than 36.7 million times, and had a radio audience of 974 million, according to Nielsen Soundscan.

“When I was cutting that song, I definitely had the sense of ‘Oh my gosh, this is one of those moments.’ I knew it was going to be a hit record,” said Workman. “I’ve had that maybe twice in my career. It was just greatness.”

MTV Making The Video: Destiny’s Child ‘Bootylicious’

Jessica Goodman / Entertainment Weekly / Friday, May 20, 2016

New Mac album almost ready

Christine McVie
Christine McVie (Photo: Reyhaan Day)

Rumours has it

After 16 years in the Kent wilderness, Christine McVie and Fleetwood Mac are creating magic once again… there’s even a new album in the pipeline.

Fleetwood Mac’s Christine McVie offers me tea and a seat on a plush sofa. Among the things on her coffee table is a picture book called Crap Taxidermy. There’s a platinum record on the wall, and a stuffed dog looks out from under a side table next to a flickering fireplace.

“Do you like my dog? I found him in an antique shop – he’s 100 years old and I call him Jarvis.”

McVie is a dog person – she had two until recently. “I had a lovely time with them, but do I miss having dogs? Dogs tie you down. Who’s going to look after them when I go on tour?” she says. “I thought about getting a bird – a parrot perhaps – and teaching it to talk.” But McVie doesn’t want to be held back any longer. “I want my freedom now.”

As one fifth of Fleetwood Mac, Christine McVie has helped define popular music since the late 1960s. With her bandmates, McVie has written songs that are loved across generations. With 1977’s Rumours, Fleetwood Mac became superstars, experiencing both critical acclaim and public adoration. She explains that there is something about the band’s music, and Rumours in particular, that appeals to all ages. “Parents played the album at home, but kids gravitated to the album as well; and now some of their children are turned on to Fleetwood Mac.” It’s something that McVie is still surprised by. “It’s really quite amazing, the dichotomy of people coming to see the shows – it ranges anywhere from 80 to eight. It’s very exciting.”

Nearly 40 years on, Rumours is an album that still resonates with audiences today – herself, included, says McVie.

“I think people love Rumours – I think that the songs are timeless and ageless. I still love Rumours too; I don’t listen to it all the time, but when I do, I’m always stunned by how fresh it still sounds.”

McVie and Fleetwood Mac achieved a virtually unparalleled level of acclaim and adoration with Rumours, but the road to success wasn’t always easy. “There weren’t that many women around back then [the 60s and early 70s]. It was a very male-oriented industry. I wasn’t in the pop industry at that time – I was playing in a blues band, so that was even more unusual.”

It was peaceful, and I learned about birds. I just wish I’d filled that 16 years with a hell of a lot more. After the house was finished, I was bouncing off the walls. It was an isolating time. I’ve wasted a bit of my life, and I want to make up for it now.

McVie had her first taste of life on the road with British blues outfit Chicken Shack; a gig she held down until she married her future band mate and Fleetwood Mac bassist John McVie in 1969.

“We had a Ford transit van and we used to schlep up and down the M1,” she recalls. The young songwriter was paying her dues, living a lifestyle far removed from what she would later experience with Fleetwood Mac. “You couldn’t say it was a life of luxury by any means.”

After a couple of years playing the British blues circuit, the band made the biggest decision of their career. “We moved to America. We thought it would be great to move to LA, because we weren’t doing anything here. We couldn’t buy a gig.”

Soon after the relocation, the band’s guitarist and driving force over the past few years Bob Welch departed, leaving Fleetwood Mac guitar-less. A chance meeting with guitarist Lindsey Buckingham led to the band bringing Buckingham and his lover and collaborator Stevie Nicks into the fold. “I was a bit cagey in case we didn’t get on or something – but we met for dinner one night and we all got on really well. We didn’t even have auditions. The rest, really, is history.”

The tide truly began to turn with the band’s 1975 self-titled album (referred to as the “White Album” by McVie) – the first with Buckingham and Nicks.

The album demonstrated a more pop-oriented sound than before. It was during the writing of Fleetwood Mac that McVie saw the band’s potential to be big. “I remember that I’d written a song called ‘Say You Love Me’. We went into a little rehearsal room in a cellar somewhere, and I said: “Well, it goes like this…’ When the chorus came, Stevie and Lindsey both chimed in with the most fantastic harmony,” says McVie.

“We all had goose bumps. That was the moment when I thought: ‘This is going to be amazing’.” With Buckingham and Nicks, the band took on an unusual dynamic. “The combination of two Americans and three Brits, two girls and two couples as well, made for all kinds of things we never could have expected.”

More than a year after its release, Fleetwood Mac went to number one on the Billboard 200 chart. “That took some time to take off,” says McVie. “Once we started touring, people started to flock to see us, and they would buy the album.” The band was receiving huge support from radio, and was riding a wave of critical acclaim and success before the band began to record a follow-up. “I don’t think people realised, but the ‘White Album’ was number one in the charts about six months before we even made Rumours.”

What happened next is rock and roll legend. Personal relations between band members hit a low; the McVies were in the midst of a divorce; and Nicks and Buckingham’s on-off relationship was strained. “When we finished Rumours, we knew we had something good – but we weren’t getting on very well. Stevie, Mick [Fleetwood] and I would get on great; Lindsey, Mick and John would get on great, but the ‘couple’ thing got quite tense in the studio sometimes.”

Against adversity, Fleetwood Mac made one of the finest albums of their career – and one of the most popular albums of all time. Rumours is estimated to have sold more than 40 million copies. McVie says there is an understanding between them, which leads to memorable music. “What’s that saying? ‘The whole is greater than the sum of its parts’. In our case that is true, because there is a great chemistry between the five of us. We’re all different, but we connect musically in a really strange way.”

In 1998, after continual chart-topping albums and lucrative tours, McVie left the band. “My father died in 1990, and I was desperate to move back to England,” she says. “I wanted to be closer to my brother who was my only remaining close family. I’d also developed a chronic fear of flying – and the band knew when I did the last tour that there was no persuading me to stay.”

McVie spent the next 16 years in Kent, restoring her house and looking after two dogs. Now McVie has mixed feelings about her time out of the spotlight. “I could say I have regrets, but then there were quite a few years doing that that I did enjoy,” she says. “It was peaceful, and I learned about birds. I just wish I’d filled that 16 years with a hell of a lot more. After the house was finished, I was bouncing off the walls. It was an isolating time. I’ve wasted a bit of my life, and I want to make up for it now.”

McVie says she came to a realisation. “There came a point when I finished doing the house that I realised I was just sitting in the country, rotting away. I thought: ‘What am I doing?’”

McVie sought the help of Dr. Richard Wolman, a Belgravia psychiatrist who helped her overcome her fear of flying. “He worked with me for quite a long time.” Soon, the idea of getting back with the band began to take shape. “It just so happened that I was thinking about what it would be like to go back to Fleetwood Mac. I called up Mick and said: ‘Do you think it’s possible? Would you guys even be interested?’” Fleetwood was arriving in London and suggested meeting to discuss a reunion.

As part of her therapy, Dr. Wolman suggested McVie buy a plane ticket. “He said: ‘If you could get on a plane, where would you go?’ I said Maui, because I love Hawaii. He told me to just buy a ticket, and said I didn’t have to get on it, but it would be a positive move. So I did.”

McVie flew from London to Hawaii with Fleetwood, who lives on the islands. “I ended up going on stage with his little blues band – he owns a restaurant called Fleetwood’s on Front Street, Lahaina. He persuaded me to play a couple of songs with his band, and I loved it.” Soon she spoke with other members of the band, and the five members that recorded Rumours were reunited.

Since McVie’s return, the band has completed a world tour taking in 120 shows. Now Fleetwood Mac is in the process of recording a new album.

I’m waiting to hear when we’re going to finish [the new Fleetwood Mac album], which I suspect will be April. Everybody has different things going on. But my feet are firmly planted in this record at the moment, because quite a lot of the songs are mine!

“I started sending demos to Lindsey and he worked on them, then we got together to start making a record – we’re talking two years ago now. We only got it half-finished; we’ve got seven or eight songs at the moment, and we’re very, very thrilled with them.”

Fans will have to be patient – getting each band member in the same room is not as easy as it once was. “I’m waiting to hear when we’re going to finish it, which I suspect will be April. Everybody has different things going on. But my feet are firmly planted in this record at the moment, because quite a lot of the songs are mine!

“The songs are fantastic, they have a whiff of Rumours about them. I think people could do with a new Mac album from the five of us.” Once the album is ready, McVie says the band will embark on another tour. “Depending on how decrepit we feel, it may not be the last. We’re all fit, so we think we can do another tour and put a record out – and people seem to love us, so we appreciate that.”

McVie says that playing with the band feels natural, even after so long out of the public eye. “It was strange in the fact that it wasn’t strange at all. The moment I stepped on stage, it felt right – it was like 16 years hadn’t happened.”

According to McVie, there is one song in particular that audiences connect with. “When I do ‘Songbird’, you can hear a pin drop. I’m not saying it’s my favourite song, particularly, but it seems to be the one that I get associated with, because people have played it at weddings, funerals or when their pets die. In all kinds of situations, people play ‘Songbird’, because it’s a little prayer. I wrote that song in 30 minutes!”

For now, McVie is back in London, and enjoying what Mayfair has to offer. “I love it around Bond Street – now I’m back in the city, that’s top of my list: burning some plastic!” As for Fleetwood Mac, she is content just seeing where the music will take her. “It’s a rebirth, in a sense – and it’s fantastic because we’re way over 60. I’m having a ball.”

Reyhaan Day / Mayfair Times / Tuesday, March 1, 2016

VIDEO: Florence & The Machine cover ‘Silver Springs’

On Friday night, British indie band Florence and the Machine covered Fleetwood Mac’s “Silver Springs” for Passport to BRITs Week, a series of charity concerts supporting War Child. Other artists on the bill include Coldplay, Bring Me the Horizon, and Jack Garratt.

War Child provides support to children whose families, communities, and schools have been torn apart by war.

Waddy Wachtel takes center stage

Waddy Wachtel
Guitarist Waddy Wachtel has been a soloist for the likes of Stevie Nicks and Keith Richards. He brings his jam session residency to the Pickwick Bowl in Burbank on Saturday, March 5. (Photo: Steve Appleford)

Rock ‘n’ roll stalwart Waddy Wachtel takes center stage.

The rock star is perhaps the most alluring figure in our pop culture. A strutting embodiment of passionate emotion, each is nonetheless completely reliant on a critical sidekick, the musical soloist upon whom they rely to elevate and complete every song. Few fulfill the role with as much sustained mastery as Waddy Wachtel, the guitarist at the center of so many major rock ‘n’ roll constellations — with Rolling Stone Keith Richards, Fleetwood Mac’s Stevie Nicks, Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, the late Warren Zevon — that he ranks as a sideman without peer.

Wachtel, who appears Saturday, March 5, at Pickwick Gardens, has been featured on so many hit records that he makes it seem almost effortless, but it’s a responsibility he takes very seriously.

“It is quite a feat to write a great song and it is quite a feat to make a great record of it,” Wachtel said. “For me it’s all about counterpoint, providing something to catch your ear within this song, between where the great singing leaves off. So, my thing is honoring songs. It’s always all about the song.”

The 69-year-old musician’s vast list of credits spans rock, pop and country, and he is constantly expanding it, working regularly as one of the most in-demand studio players in the business.

There’s no retiring in this business, you just keep going … If you can still play, you play. I’m too old to be doing this, but I still do it. Ferociously. – Waddy Wachtel

“I am still definitely playing sessions all the time,” he said. “I just did a great rock ‘n’ roll tune with Sheryl Crow. Next week I’m recording with LeAnn Rimes. There’s always lots to do. The sessions are very important.”

The Wachtel saga is a colorful and apparently fated one, which he recounts in a swift, loping style. “I grew up in Jackson Heights, New York, started playing guitar when I was about nine, moved to L.A. at 20 in ’68,” Wachtel said. “I came out here with a band, and, right off, I met David Crosby, who let me know that I ‘was the only guy in the band.’ I said ‘Oh no, don’t tell me that.’ The band was pretty good, great singers, but it was going nowhere, mostly due to lousy management. So I disbanded it and by 1970 I had my first gig, with the Everly Brothers.

“I started meeting all these session players and I thought ‘Hey, I’m as good as these guys.’ Well, not all of them, because some of these session guys were just amazing musicians, but I thought ‘I can do that.’ And I met Nick Venet, who had produced the first albums by the Beach Boys and Linda Ronstadt and he liked me a lot, so I started getting more studio jobs. Then I met [famed producer] David Foster, and he also liked what I was doing and he introduced me to [manager-record executive] Lou Adler, and we were just working like crazy from then on.”

“I have been very lucky. It’s been an incredible ride, Los Angeles was just such an open, creative place then, it was an amazing time to be here. I was playing with Linda Ronstadt and then James Taylor, I met Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, played on their album around 1980 and we’ve been together ever since. And that’s when I met Keith Richards, and we immediately hit it off. The next thing I know I get this message: ‘Call Keith. He’s looking for you,’ and so I get him on the phone and he said ‘I’m putting a band together and you are in it.’ Well, what can you say but ‘OK!’ And that was the X-pensive Winos.” [Editor’s note: Buckingham Nicks was released in 1973, so Wachtel was likely misquoted about first playing with Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham.]

Always more often in the studio than out on the road, Wachtel eventually developed an enduringly popular club gig, his famed Big Monday at Los Angeles club the Joint. “About 15 ago, [singer-songwriter] Jack Tempchin decided he wanted to start playing live, so we put together a band, Terry Reid was in it, Bernard Fowler, Blondie Chaplin, Rick Rosas and we were playing every week, and we found that whenever we did a rock tune the audience reaction was incredible. They went wild. So we gradually stopped playing so many originals and we turned into the best rock cover band in the world. We were there for years, and so many great guests would come in. We had everybody: Robert Plant, Keith Richards, Bobby Womack, Neil Young — he got up one night and did 45 minutes with us.”

The club eventually closed and Big Mondays evaporated, but now Wachtel intends resurrect the night.

“So now, at Pickwick, we want to keep it going, and whenever everybody’s in town, they will come down and we’ll do it,” Wachtel said. “Unfortunately, Rick is no longer with us, and Bernard is out with the Stones but Blondie Chaplin will be at this Pickwick show. It’s an amazing lineup of great musicians: Phil Jones, Jamie Savko, Keith Allison, Brett Tuggle, Al Ortiz, Danny Kortchmar. It’s always an overpoweringly rock ‘n’ roll event — we do ’em strong and true. It’s a lot of fun and a lot of work. People always say ‘Oh, you do such great jams’ and I tell ’em this is no jam. We work very hard to sound this loose!”

“There’s no retiring in this business, you just keep going. I mean, the Stones all thought that band would only last four or five years. Nobody thought rock ‘n’ roll would last. If you can still play, you play. I’m too old to be doing this, but I still do it. Ferociously.”

What: Waddy Wachtel Band

Where: Pickwick Gardens’ Pavilion Room, 1001 W. Riverside Dr., Burbank

When: Saturday, March 5, 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.

Cost: $17 to $28.

More info: (818) 848-8810, waddywachtelinfo.com/WaddyWachtelBand.html

JONNY WHITESIDE is a veteran music journalist based in Burbank and author of “Ramblin’ Rose: the Life & Career of Rose Maddox” and “Cry: the Johnnie Ray Story.”

Jonny Whiteside / LA Times / Friday, February 26, 2016