Fleetwood Mac ranks #10 on ‘The Rich List’

(Photo: Joshua Mellin)
(Photo: Joshua Mellin)

On Monday, Billboard revealed its ranking of the highest-paid musicians of the past year. Fleetwood Mac made the Top 10, ranking at #10 with gross earnings topping $19 million in 2013.

Fleetwood Mac’s numbers were fueled by a highly lucrative 2013 North American and European tour and the release of Extended Play and Deluxe and Expanded reissues of their 1977 classic album Rumours.

10. Fleetwood Mac
2013 Earnings: $19,123,101.98

As befits this classic rock mainstay, the bulk of Fleetwood Mac’s earnings came from its 2013 world tour, which covered 34 cities and take-home pay of $17.4 million. The trek’s high point included three nights at London’s O2 Arena. There, Christine McVie, 70, joined the band for the final two shows to perform “Don’t Stop” — a prelude to her coming back full-time for 2014’s Reunion Tour (that trek was potentially sidetracked due to the recent cancer diagnosis of John McVie, 68). The band also released its first new studio material in a decade, Extended Play. It reached No. 48 on the Billboard 200.

Music’s Top 40 Money Makers 2014: The Rich List

  1. Taylor Swift
  2. Kenny Chesney
  3. Justin Timberlake
  4. Bon Jovi
  5. Rolling stones
  6. Beyoncé
  7. Maroon 5
  8. Luke Bryan
  9. P!nk
  10. Fleetwood Mac
  11. Justin Bieber
  12. Bruno Mars
  13. One Direction
  14. Jason Aldean
  15. George Strait
  16. Jay Z
  17. Michael Bublé
  18. Mumford & Sons
  19. Dave Matthews band
  20. Rihanna
  21. Paul McCartney
  22. The Eagles
  23. Celion Dion
  24. Trans-Siberian Orchestra
  25. Phish
  26. Kayne West
  27. Blake Shelton
  28. John Mayer
  29. New Kids on the Block
  30. Zac Brown Band
  31. Imagine Dragons
  32. Jimmy Buffett
  33. Elton John
  34. Rascal Flatts
  35. Rush
  36. Miranda Lambert
  37. Lil Wayne
  38. Tim McGraw
  39. Eminem
  40. Carrie Underwood

METHODOLOGY: The data used to compile Money Makers was supplied by Nielsen SoundScan, Nielsen BDS and Billboard Boxscore. Artists are ranked by U.S. earnings, calculated from touring, recorded- music sales, publishing royalties and revenue from digital music and video streaming. Due to a lack of data, revenue from sponsor- ship, merchandising and synchronization isn’t included. For album and track sales, Billboard assumed a royalty rate of 20 percent of retail, minus producers’ fees. Billboard treated all streaming revenue as derived from licensing deals and split that to calculate the artist’s take. Billboard applied statutory mechanical rates for album and track sales and Copyright Royalty Board-determined rates or -approved formulas for streaming. For labels’ direct deals with interactive services, Billboard used a blended rate of $0.00525 for audio and $0.005 for video streams. Billboard subtracted a manager’s fee of 10 percent. For box office, each artist was credited with 34 percent of the gross, typically what’s left after the promoter and manager’s cuts and other costs are subtracted.

Stevie lets loose on UK talk show

Stevie lets loose on UK talk show Loose Women! Stevie spent about ten minutes with the ladies of Loose Women to talk about her relationship with Lindsey Buckingham as it stands today and her recent documentary In Your Dreams. She also gave some candid advice to the current crop of singers singing about nothing but partying.

“I had a talk with Lindsey, the everything I wanted to say to you for 35 years talk.”

2013-0912 Loose Women UK

Stevie spent about ten minutes with the ladies of Loose Women to talk about her relationship with Lindsey Buckingham as it stands today and her recent documentary In Your Dreams. She also gave some candid advice to the current crop of singers singing about partying: “That’s what everybody’s singing about, but it’s going to get very, very boring very, very fast to everybody, so you better start thinking about something else to write about. You tell ’em Stevie!

The UK-based Loose Women is similar to The View in the US.

Don’t Stop!

Uncut (UK) has featured Fleetwood Mac for its October 2013 issue. The feature contains a new interview with drummer Mick Fleetwood.

Uncut (UK) has featured Fleetwood Mac for its October 2013 issue. The feature contains a new interview with drummer Mick Fleetwood. To subscribe to Uncut, click here.

Fleetwood Mac among ‘Hottest Live Photos,” according to Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone included Fleetwood Mac among its “Hottest Live Photos of 2013” gallery feature. The photo, taken by Ethan Miller for Getty Images, is of drummer Mick Fleetwood from Fleetwood Mac’s May 26 concert at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

(Ethan Miller)
(Ethan Miller)

Rolling Stone included Fleetwood Mac among its “Hottest Live Photos of 2013” gallery feature. The photo, taken by Ethan Miller for Getty Images, is of drummer Mick Fleetwood from Fleetwood Mac’s May 26 concert at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas (photo number 59 in the sequence). You can view the other photos in the gallery here.

EXCLUSIVE: Excess all areas

Mick Fleetwood has survived nearly 50 years in rock’s most dysfunctional band, Fleetwood Mac. Now they’re back on the road. The Sunday Times’ correspondent Matt Munday interviews Mick Fleetwood in this new interview promoting Fleetwood Mac’s upcoming UK tour.

2013-0818 The Sunday TimesMick Fleetwood has survived nearly 50 years in rock’s most dysfunctional band, Fleetwood Mac. Now they’re back on the road

Mick Fleetwood looks like a bohemian Santa with his bushy white beard, pastel shirt, black waistcoat and flat cap. Not all his tales from the rock’n’roll frontline are as jolly as his appearance, though. At one point he has to choke back tears of regret. He has lived a life of such abandon that he admits he is lucky to still be here. “I’ve inherited some good genes,” he explains.

It is often reported that Fleetwood put $8m of cocaine up his nose, and though this is an exaggeration, he says, if he hadn’t stopped consuming the drug so vigorously “the next stop would have been a wooden box”. His former bandmate in Fleetwood Mac, Christine McVie, had earlier told me that the men in the band used to rack out lines of coke like “blooming great rails” – whereas she and Stevie Nicks, the female contingent, would restrict themselves to “ladylike” portions, carried around their necks in jeweled buckles that had dainty silver spoons inside. “It was the 1970s,” she shrugged. “There was a lot going around.”

“I’m not advocating cocaine at all, but the truth is, I had a good time,” says Fleetwood. “But then, without realising it, you’re getting too out of it. You’re sleeping for three days, or you’re up for nine days or whatever. And eventually you don’t feel good at any time.”

He quit taking coke “a long time ago,” but the booze has been harder to let go. “I haven’t been drunk for five months now,” he announces. With a 46-date tour of America about to begin soon after we meet, followed by European dates including four in Britain in September, he has had to shape up. “I knew I was drinking too much,” he says. “And the more I don’t drink, the more I realise I was really drinking too much.”

‘I was still behaving like I was 32 years old, and you can’t be doing that shit. I suppose I was late getting off the bus’

Why still so excessive? Fleetwood is 66 — aren’t these meant to be the golden years, where living is easy? “We’re all still learning to take care of ourselves,” he says, “because Fleetwood Mac have worked really hard at pushing some envelopes. And of course you’ve got to change your behaviours, but I’ve had moments — really not that long ago — where I wasn’t getting it. I was still behaving like I was 32 years old, and you can’t be doing that shit. I suppose I was late getting off the bus.”

Perhaps it has also been the process of writing his autobiography, Play On, due to be published by Little, Brown next year, that has helped Fleetwood to take stock and start implementing some changes. Toning down his lifestyle has not been easy — playing rock’n’roll is practically all he has ever done (aside from dabbling as a restaurateur, with rather mixed results).

He was born in 1947 in Redruth, Cornwall, to a military family. His grandfather, John, had been killed at Gallipoli in the Great War, and his father, Mike, had served in the RAF in the Second World War. Like many army brats, Mick was sent to boarding school, but hated it because he was an undiagnosed dyslexic, and as a result “didn’t learn shit”.

This gave him a lifelong fear of structured learning. “To this day, I don’t know what I’m doing,” he confesses. “I actually don’t know what a verse is, or a chorus. You can sing a song and show me, but don’t give me a bit of paper and say, ‘Oh, you know that bit there…’ ”

He says he is nervous about the tour, and still suffers from severe stage fright. “I’m just hoping I don’t forget all my parts.”

It seems extraordinary that he still feels so shaky — despite having spent the last 47 years performing in one of the most commercially successful British rock bands since the Beatles.

“It goes way back,” he says. “So this is going to be interesting. I’ll have a glass of wine beforehand, but I don’t want to drink myself into a stupor just so I don’t get frightened. If I have four glasses of wine during a show, that’s cool — so long as I don’t get on the plane and finish off two more bottles.”

It is also surprising how raw he seems. I suspect he may be playing up to his own mythology a little — he is a self-confessed drama queen — but the disquiet seems real. I ask if his fear of not feeling is ultimately the fear of losing his creativity. “It’s more a fear of losing my life,” he says, dramatically.

Fleetwood left school as soon as he could, at 16, and moved to London to join the thriving blues scene. In this milieu he would meet bass guitarist John McVie, son of a west London sheet-metal worker, and they formed a band in 1967 with the guitarist Peter Green, who was a big star back then, but also a troubled soul who hated the limelight. So Green named the group after its rhythm section — Fleetwood Mac.

Success would follow, as did numerous line-up changes. Peter Green dropped too much acid and developed schizophrenia, and a series of other guitarists each had their own failings. One, Danny Kirwan, was highly strung and wept while he played; another, Bob Weston, was sacked after an affair with Fleetwood’s first wife, Jenny; and a third, Jeremy Spencer, popped out of a hotel in Los Angeles to buy a newspaper, joined a religious cult and never returned.

When things fell apart it was often Mick who rallied the troops and kept things going — he even became the band’s manager for a spell. “Mick would never let it end,” says Christine McVie. “Fleetwood Mac is his baby.”

Having moved to America with the band in the early 1970s after a career lull, Fleetwood met two penniless musicians in LA, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, then a couple, and invited them to join.

‘We’re totally driven by drama. I think we’re calming down a bit, but we’re terrified of not feeling. It’s sort of an addiction, really’

The first record they did together in 1975, Fleetwood Mac, was a hit that sold 5m copies. But their career zenith arrived a year later with the release of the follow-up, Rumours. To date, the album has sold more than 40m copies and is the ninth bestseller of all time. And it is still winning them new fans: it was reissued in Britain in January this year and went straight into the album chart at No 3.

What made rumours such a powerful piece of work was an almost perfect storm of dysfunction that engulfed its creators — and which still affects the band now. As they recorded the album in Sausalito, California, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks’s 10-year relationship was ending; the eight-year marriage of the other couple in the band, Christine and John McVie, had just imploded; and Fleetwood’s marriage to the model Jenny Boyd, with whom he has two daughters, had also recently collapsed.

To make matters even more intense, their failed relationships became the subject of the bitter breakup lyrics, which were artfully juxtaposed with sweet soft-rock melodies. But despite the shared heartbreak (and mutual loathing, depending on who was in the room together), all could hear the music’s potential. Songs such as “Dreams” and “Go Your Own Way” would take them to the top of the charts in record-breaking style — “Michael Jackson territory” is how Lindsey Buckingham describes it. So they famously anaesthetised themselves with cocaine from an ever-present velvet bag to endure the recording. Keep numb and carry on.

“Imagine your relationship fell apart, but you had children, and you both have to put your shit away to some extent and make sure the children aren’t damaged,” Fleetwood says. “The band was our child. We got through it, and not without some damage emotionally. Plus, it was the only thing we knew.”

2013-0818 The Sunday TimesWell, almost. Fleetwood also knew how to party. The bandmate he is most similar to in this regard, he says, is Stevie Nicks — the witchy blonde rock goddess whose long, and ultimately successful, struggle with cocaine and tranquillisers is well documented. “We’re totally driven by drama,” says Fleetwood. “I think we’re calming down a bit, but we’re terrified of not feeling. So if nothing’s happening you’ll worry yourself into creating a drama — just so you’ve got something to react to. It’s sort of an addiction, really.”

And a highly lucrative addiction it has been, thanks to Fleetwood Mac’s ability to convert personal tragedy into musical alchemy. Rumours made the five members of Fleetwood Mac — the “classic” line-up — extremely rich. Estimates of the net worth of Lindsey Buckingham (guitar, vocals, production), Stevie Nicks (vocals, tambourine), Christine McVie (keyboard, vocals) and John McVie (bass) range from $45m up to $65m.

Estimates for Mick Fleetwood’s haul are markedly more moderate: around $9m. This is partly because he has not been as prolific a songwriter as other members: he’s the drummer, so earns more from touring than from royalties. He has also lost a fortune on bad property deals and failed restaurants, though this hasn’t deterred him from opening another, Fleetwood’s on Front St, on the Hawaiian island of Maui, where he lives (he recently separated from his third wife, Lynn). A “Mick’s Margarita” from the cocktail menu includes tequila, elderflower liqueur, fresh-pressed lime juice, agave nectar and is “capped with Mick’s Pinot Noir.”

For years after Rumours, the private-jet lifestyle kept running into turbulence. The band were papering over the cracks, which must surely have widened when Fleetwood and Nicks had a fling, although Buckingham, her ex, denies it caused a problem. “It was a reflection of the times we were living in,” he told me. “You can’t separate individual acts from the times. Stevie was prolific in that way, shall we say, and so was Mick — and so was I. So it never really bothered me at all. I had dealt with the hurt of losing Stevie long before that.”

But at least Mick was gentleman enough to tell Buckingham about the affair in person before the latter heard any, um, rumours. “He came over to my house and sat me down at my kitchen table and said, ‘Me and Stevie are an item,’ ” says Buckingham. “And I said, ‘Oh, OK.’ Because, really, should I have been surprised?”

The bubble was always going to burst. Christine McVie went on to date the Beach Boy Dennis Wilson — another renowned sybarite — before eventually burning out in the late 1990s, selling her LA mansion and moving to a Kent farmhouse to lead a “solitary life.” This, she told me, has recently become “rather lonely — apart from my brother and sister-in-law I still don’t know anyone down here.” She keeps in touch with the band, but insists she has no plans to rejoin and won’t be performing on this tour (she hasn’t ruled out a cameo appearance for the British dates, however). Buckingham, meanwhile, left Fleetwood Mac for nine years, before returning in 1996.

“We were Bonnie and Clyde, me and Stevie, and Lindsey got fed up with it,” Fleetwood says. “But he left out of fear — he didn’t want to be around us, because we were too stoned. Only recently, he admitted that he was really frightened that Stevie was going to die, and he didn’t want to be around it. That’s a really deep-rooted regard for someone. And that’s, ah…” his voice is suddenly trembling and his eyes are moist, but the British stiff upper lip fast reasserts itself. “That’s part of our whole thing.”

‘We were Bonnie and Clyde, me and Stevie, and Lindsey got fed up with it,’ Fleetwood says

Predictably, this isn’t quite the way Buckingham recalls it. “Frightened may not be the right word,” he says evenly. “It was more frustrated. Or maybe I was frightened, but for myself. Everyone in that subculture thought that drugs were what you had to do; that turned out to be a load of crap. You can be just as creative when you’re sober. There was this idea that we were somehow rejecting values we didn’t believe in. And the irony was that we ended up becoming just as decadent as the things we were railing against.”

As the Fleetwood Mac tour got underway, news broke that Fleetwood’s third marriage had crumbled — it was reported that he had filed for joint custody of his twin 11-year-old daughters. I wondered whether he would find succor among his bandmates, and whether he would conquer his demons on the road.

Months later, I spoke to Stevie Nicks and asked how things were going. “I don’t know what’s come over Mick, but he’s on fire,” she said. “He’s playing better than he’s ever played. He’s rocking on that stage.”

According to Nicks, Fleetwood had been venting everything during the shows — but not in the bar afterwards. The party animal had remained in his cage. “I’m up there onstage looking at everybody and thinking this is amazing, because we’re all sober up here,” Nicks intoned in a husky voice full of warmth and melancholy. “Nobody’s drunk. And we’re all having an incredible time.”

Nicks also revealed that she and Buckingham had only recently made their peace, after falling out in 2003 over creative differences (neither will elaborate). Oh, the drama — when will it ever end? Anyway, Nicks had promised Fleetwood that she would try to repair the relationship before the tour.

“I said to Lindsey, ‘We have got to change this. We cannot be enemies for one more day,’ ” Nicks recalled. “Because you never know — things happen. You don’t know if you’ll ever tour again. So we have to walk on stage hand in hand, and we have to mean it.”

And, against all odds, that’s what they appear to have done. Peace has finally broken out among the ranks of Fleetwood Mac. God only knows whether it will last. There is even talk of a new album — the band brought out a four-track EP, Extended Play, in April, their first new material for 10 years, and it has been warmly received by fans and critics. Naturally it’s full of elegiac songs about dysfunctional relationships and aching hearts.

“This might sound corny,” Fleetwood had said to me, just before we said goodbye, “but the biggest rumour about Fleetwood Mac is that we don’t really like each other. I understand why people would think that, after everything we’ve said and done. But the reality is, we love each other. We just push the wrong buttons.”

Fleetwood Mac tour the UK and Ireland this autumn; Rumours (Deluxe Reissue) is out now

The Sunday Times (UK) / Matt Munday / Sunday, August 18, 2013

Return of the Mac (video)

Correspondent Rahni Sadler speaks to legendary rock icons Fleetwood Mac on Australian program Sunday Night. In the new feature, Stevie Nicks talks about her relationships with fellow bandmates Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham and her late mom Barbara Nicks. The clip includes archival material and concert footage from Fleetwood Mac’s final show of the North American tour in Sacramento, California, on July 6, 2013.

Correspondent Rahni Sadler speaks to legendary rock icons Fleetwood Mac on Australian program Sunday Night. In the new feature, Stevie Nicks talks about her relationships with fellow bandmates Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham and her late mom Barbara Nicks. The clip includes archival material and concert footage from Fleetwood Mac’s final show of the North American tour in Sacramento, California, on July 6, 2013.

2013-0811 Sunday Night Australia

Vegas show tickets on sale Saturday

Tickets for Fleetwood Mac’s concert at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas on Monday, December 30 go on sale this Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Ticketmaster has published the ticket link to purchase tickets. Tickets are priced at $99.50, $149.50 and $224.50, excluding applicable service charges.

(Neal Preston)
(Neal Preston)

Tickets for Fleetwood Mac’s concert at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas on Monday, December 30, go on sale this Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Ticketmaster has published the ticket link to purchase tickets online. Tickets are priced at $99.50, $149.50 and $224.50, excluding applicable service charges.

Fleetwood Mac to perform year-end show at Las Vegas MGM Grand, Dec 30

Fleetwood Mac, one of rock’s most enduring, beloved and successful bands, will close out 2013 with a special, end-of-the-year concert at the MGM Grand Garden Arena Monday, Dec. 30. The show is scheduled to start at 8 p.m. Tickets priced at $99.50, $149.50 and $224.50, not including applicable service charges, go on sale Saturday, Aug. 3 at 10 a.m. and are available at all Las Vegas Ticketmaster locations.

(Neal Preston)
(Neal Preston)

Fleetwood Mac to wrap 2013 with concert at MGM Grand Garden Arena, 12/30

Fleetwood Mac, one of rock’s most enduring, beloved and successful bands, will close out 2013 with a special, end-of-the-year concert at the MGM Grand Garden Arena Monday, Dec. 30. The show is scheduled to start at 8 p.m.

Tickets priced at $99.50, $149.50 and $224.50, not including applicable service charges, go on sale Saturday, Aug. 3 at 10 a.m. and are available at all Las Vegas Ticketmaster locations (select Smith’s Food and Drug Centers and Ritmo Latino). Ticket sales are limited to eight (8) per person. To charge by phone with a major credit card, call Ticketmaster at (800) 745-3000. Tickets also are available for purchase at http://www.mgmgrand.com or http://www.ticketmaster.com.

For fans anxious to purchase seats to highly anticipated concerts and events, M life – MGM Resorts International’s loyalty program – provides members exclusive access to pre-sales for sporting events and concerts. The program also features rewards, benefits and once-in-a-lifetime experiences at the incomparable collection of MGM Resorts’ world-renowned destinations. To join, or for more information, visit http://www.mlife.com.

The current Fleetwood Mac lineup includes Stevie Nicks, Lindsey Buckingham and original members Mick Fleetwood and John McVie. The band recently completed the Fleetwood Mac Live 2013 arena tour, its first time touring since 2009. The tour marked the 35th anniversary of the release of the classic album Rumours, one of the most successful albums in history with sales exceeding 40 million copies. It remained at the top of the pop charts for more than 31 weeks and produced four Top 10 singles.

Formed in 1967, Fleetwood Mac has released more than 15 albums and sold more than 100 million albums worldwide. The multi-GRAMMY Award-winning band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. Popular singles include “Go Your Own Way,” “Landslide,” “Dreams,” “You Make Loving Fun” and “Don’t Stop,” among others.

For more information, visit http://www.fleetwoodmac.com.

BWW Music / Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Retro rock is hot

While video may have killed the radio star, the Internet certainly has repurposed the classic rock star. Your grandfather’s rock band is now a Rock Band video game. Older acts like Fleetwood Mac and the Rolling Stones are hot these days. Classic albums are topping iTunes charts, and bands with AARP cards are embarking on successful tours filled with fans of many ages. Heck, even Black Sabbath had a No. 1 album on Billboard last month.

Bands from the ’60s to the ’90s enjoying chart and touring success

Stevie Nicks, left, and Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac perform at the Staples Center in Los Angeles on July 3, 2013. (Associated Press)
Stevie Nicks, left, and Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac perform at the Staples Center in Los Angeles on July 3, 2013. (Associated Press)

On the fringes of computer science, a prediction exists that within the next century, every human will be able to upload the entirety of his or her genome to a computer program. The upshot: We’ll all live forever in virtual reality.

The prediction might be far from the mainstream, but what naysayers fail to recognize is the Internet has already begun the first phase of human immortality. As comedian Patton Oswalt put it in an editorial for “Wired” magazine, “We’re on the brink of Etewaf: Everything That Ever Was — Available Forever.”

Yes, in the Internet age, nothing has to die, which is particularly good news for aging celebrities whose best work is far behind them. After all, with our endless market for nostalgia and ability to access just about anything from the past — from “Leave It To Beaver” episodes to footage of Fats Waller to 1980s Pepsi commercials — past glories can now be raised from the dead like so many zombies and made present again.

So it is with the ever-changing pop music landscape. While video may have killed the radio star, the Internet certainly has repurposed the classic rock star. Your grandfather’s rock band is now a Rock Band video game.

Older acts are hot these days. Classic albums are topping iTunes charts, and bands with AARP cards are embarking on successful tours filled with fans of many ages. Heck, even Black Sabbath had a No. 1 album on Billboard last month.

In fact, according to Pollstar, a group that tracks concert earnings, out of the top 20 grossing tours in the world right now, nearly half are acts that peaked at least 30 years ago. Next to Carrie Underwood and Taylor Swift, for example, are Styx and New Kids On The Block, which makes quite a motley crew. Speaking of which, Motley Crüe recently ranked at No. 13.

Silver Springs attraction in recent years has added many classic rock bands to concert seasons traditionally powered by country acts. The Marion County park has presented Styx, Foghat, Night Ranger, Kansas, Foreigner, KC and the Sunshine Band, .38 Special, Loverboy, Joan Jett and REO Speedwagon. The concerts attract tens of thousands from around North Central Florida.

“We’re going after that 35-to-45 age demographic, and they like to rock,” said the park’s marketing director Brooks Jordan a few years back, shortly after the park booked Eddie Money and Rick Springfield.

Next up at Silver Springs: 1980s metal-pop band Whitesnake.

“It’s all about connecting people with some memory of a happy time in their life,” said William McKeen, former professor and chairman of the journalism department at the University of Florida (and currently holding that position at Boston University).

McKeen also has published many acclaimed books on music, including 2011’s “Mile Marker Zero.” He said he recently saw Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons in Boston and that there seems to be an active circuit for nostalgia acts.

“I think they’re playing on the nostalgia of the Baby-Boomers,” he said. “I was a young swain in the early-’70s when we were going through that first great rock ‘n’ roll revival. Chuck Berry and Little Richard, and all those people were touring again and they weren’t selling new product. They were selling the nostalgia.

“And the funny thing was, all these kids like me who were born in the ’50s and therefore couldn’t remember the originals, we embraced that time and that culture. My wife was born in the ’70s, and she loves disco because that was the music around the time of her birth. It’s kind of like everyone tries to fall in love with maybe the music we were conceived to.”

Silver Springs resident and rock ‘n’ roller Pam DaCosta is a regular concertgoer, although she says her reasons go beyond simple nostalgia.

“I’ve been this way forever,” said DaCosta, who grew up in the 1980s. “My sister thinks I’m going through a midlife crisis, but I said to her, ‘You know I’ve always been this way. I just love going to concerts.’”

DaCosta favors the bands that were popular when she was a teenager — groups such as Kix and Tesla, both of which she saw on the Monsters of Rock Cruise, a four-day jaunt from Miami to the Bahamas and back. DaCosta went on the cruise in March and is planning on going again next March, when the cruise will feature Cinderella, Winger, Ratt and many others of the 1980s hair metal period.

“It brings you back to another time, reliving your youth so to speak,” said DaCosta, who also attended the packed Styx concert at the Ocala Entertainment Complex in 2011. The gold-and-platinum selling band returned to Marion County about a year later for a packed gig at Silver Springs.

Yet, many artists contend, the adults who grew up with them decades ago are not the only ones fueling the retro resurgence.

Mike Reno, lead singer of chart-topping ’80s band Loverboy, noted the band’s music continues to resurface in modern pop culture. Twentysomethings also flock to Loverboy concerts.

“I guess they just love the energy, you know? That’s the only thing I can imagine,” Reno told the Star-Banner in 2010. “They come in droves. It’s really quite amazing.”

Facts

TOP CONCERT TOURS
(The Top Concert Tours as of July 8, 2013. Data provided to Pollstar by concert promoters and venue managers.)

1. The Rolling Stones
2. Taylor Swift
3. Kenny Chesney
4. Fleetwood Mac
5. Dave Matthews Band
6. Justin Bieber
7. New Kids On The Block
8. Tim McGraw
9. Brad Paisley
10. Jason Aldean
11. Carrie Underwood
12. Widespread Panic
13. Barry Manilow
14. Motley Crue
15. Styx/REO Speedwagon/Ted Nugent

Travis Atria / Gainesville Sun / Sunday, July 28, 2013

TODAY IN STEVIE HISTORY: Stevie performs Leather & Lace with Maroon 5

(Video courtesy of Heather Elizabeth)

On July 25, 2011, Stevie joined Maroon 5 during the encore of the band’s Hollywood Bowl show for a crowd-pleasing rendition of her and Don Henley’s 1981 hit duet “Leather and Lace.” With Stevie stepping up her vocals and lead singer Adam Levine assuming Henley’s high tenor role, the performance received thunderous ovation from the audience. Stevie played up the onstage antics by playfully offering her hand to Levine, who responded by kneeling and bowing before her. The crowd roared in approval.

Both acts have mutual respect and love for each others’ music.