REWIND: Rolling Stone Q&A with Stevie Nicks, July 2001

01_tisl02-medium

Originally published on July 5, 2001

A fog is pouring over the Pacific Coast Highway toward Stevie Nicks’ Southern California home, but the singer’s mood could hardly be brighter. The Fleetwood Mac alumna’s Trouble in Shangri-La has just entered the Billboard 200 at an impressive Number Five. Sheryl Crow, who co-produced five tracks, joined Nicks on the album, as did Macy Gray, Sarah McLachlan and Dixie Chick Natalie Maines. Nicks is also recovering from drug addiction— her latest was to the tranquilizer Klonopin. More recently, she’s come back from shooting her part in Destiny’s Child’s video for “Bootylicious,” which samples the Nicks classic “Edge of Seventeen.” “The wild thing is we’re together at, like, Number One and Number Five, and, of course, there’s about a 5,000-year age difference,” Nicks says with a sunny laugh.

RS: Do you feel you’ve become a sort of Mother Superior for women in music?

I do. I do. And it’s a nice feeling — I certainly would have never gone out looking for that, but it seems to be coming to me. I guess these are just all my lost children coming back into my arms.

RS: What do you think of how women in music sell their sexuality these days?

I definitely used my sexuality in a certain way. I kind of draped it all in chiffon and soft lights and suede boots. Everybody now is just much more blatant  Personally, I think that being a little more mysterious works better, and it lasts longer. You should be very careful that you don’t build everything you have around how cute you are or how sexy you are, because, unfortunately, no matter how cute you are or how sexy you are, in fifteen years, that won’t be the most important part of your music. I knew that in my twenties. And I prepared for that.

RS: Do players really only love you when they’re playing?

That’s just about groupies and rock stars and what happens out there on the road. It really doesn’t happen out there on the road to women. It didn’t really happen to me, but I saw it happening all around me.

RS: I hear you’re into doing Pilates these days. Has Pilates replaced Klonopin for you?

No, nothing replaces Klonopin. I’m not addicted to working out. I enjoy it, and I am doing it now not because I want to be thin but because I want to be healthy in twenty years.

RS: With all that you’ve lived through, are you surprised you’re still alive?

I am amazed. I feel very lucky. If I had not caught that Klonopin thing, I am absolutely sure I would have been dead in a year — no doubt in my mind. I feel really lucky that somebody tapped me on the shoulder — some little spirit — and said, You know what? You better go to a hospital right now and get better.

RS: Did drugs ever erode your love for music?

The Klonopin eroded my love for everything. Klonopin is a tranquilizer. So between Klonopin for the calm and some Prozac for the wellness feeling, you are never inspired. That’s what it does.

RS: Did you sense that this album was going to turn things around for you?

Well, I knew that this record would either make me or break me. I figured if I could do an album that the world loved after being addicted to that Klonopin stuff for eight years, and just having that be such a black hole, that I would be back on my way. That’s kind of how I feel. And the Fleetwood Mac reunion just slipped in there. I didn’t ever think that Fleetwood Mac would get back together. On that tour, I really regained my power, so when I came home from the Fleetwood Mac tour, I was really ready to finish this record.

RS: Even though Christine McVie has now retired from the group, is it safe to say there is a future for Fleetwood Mac?

Totally. Lindsey [Buckingham] and I and Mick [Fleetwood] and John [McVie], we are going to do this. Christine is OK. She has set us free and let us go. And she wants us to do this if we want to. And so we are going to do it. As soon as I get done with this [Shangri-La tour], and Lindsey is finished doing whatever he does in the next year, we’ll be done and we’ll come together, and we’ll do a record. And there’s a possibility that Sheryl could be a little involved in that.

RS: As someone who lived through the ultimate rock & roll interoffice romance, do you have any advice for us on the subject?

It doesn’t work. It just doesn’t, because when all the business and everything else is blended, you don’t have any space for anything.

RS: On the other hand, you’ve had some fascinating men in your life — Lindsey Buckingham, Don Henley, Jimmy Iovine.

They are all still my really good friends today. I just talked to Don Henley an hour and a half ago. We just did an incredible benefit for MS (Multiple Sclerosis) in Dallas two weeks ago. All the men who were in my life I’m friends with now, and it’s really nice. I chose to not be married. I chose to be single. I have a lot of fun this way. I can do anything I want, go anywhere I want, be with anybody I want, and I’m not angering anybody. Nobody is ever upset with me.

RS: It must be intimidating to ask you out. It’s like asking out Cinderella.

I would think it would be very intimidating for people. That’s probably why most people don’t, you know, because they’re scared [laughs]. I figure if there’s a soul mate for me out there somewhere, I’ll find him. He’ll find me.

RS: Is the secret to your success that you really are a witch after all?

I’m not a witch.

RS: Not even a good witch, Stevie?

I just like Halloween, and I thought that blondes look skinnier in black. That was my whole idea for that whole thing — a long, cool woman in a black dress, right?

By David Wild /Rolling Stone / July 5, 2001

Nicks gets by with a lotta help from her friends

By Cathalena E. Burch
Arizona Daily Star
Friday, December 7, 2001

PHOENIX — Stevie Nicks’ waited until taking her final bow before choking back a tear that was welling for the better part of her 2 1/2-hour show Thursday night.

“Take care of each other and be good to each other. Life is so fragile,” she said, referring to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York.

The 9,000 people loosely filling Nicks’ hometown arena cheered in support and allowed their favorite daughter a moment of emotional indulgence.

They owed her that much for helping them to forgot about the attacks, the war on terrorism and much else to do about the world outside of America West Arena.

Nicks and a few of her friends took the audience back to the cold war 1980s, before anyone had really heard of a madman named Osama bin Laden.

Thursday night’s show was a fund-raiser for the Arizona Heart Institute Foundation. But with the exception of State Attorney General Janet Napolitano and a suit-clad foundation official saying a few words, you never would have known that the evening was dedicated to such warm-and-fuzzy pursuits.

The audience came to see the legendary Nicks and her enviable cast of friends — Mick Fleetwood, Lindsey Buckingham, Don Henley, Sheryl Crow and Natalie Maines.

From the opening chords of “Stop Dragging My Heart Around,” Nicks turned back the clock 20 years, to the days when her ethereal, mystical voice ruled the radio.

Not daunted by age or the ever changing pop music landscape, she sounded and looked just as she had back then, sans the after-effects of heavy partying. She swirled, she twirled, she bent down in that swoop and turn that made everyone want to be a gypsy like her.

Granted, she didn’t bend as low as she did in her youth, but the magic was just as tangible.

And infectious.

Nicks barely uttered the first words of “Stand Back” when the crowd took over, their chorus overflowing the arena. They boldly and loudly sang along to every song she performed: “Edge of Seventeen,” “Rhiannon,” “Gold Dust Woman,” “Enchanted.”

One by one she invited each of her special friends to share the mike on a song that forever ties them to Nicks: Henley on “Leather and Lace,” Maines on “Too Far From Texas,” Crow on “Sorcerer” and Buckingham on the classic “Landslide,” a song the pair dedicated to Nicks’ father, Jess.

As Buckingham picked the intricate notes on his guitar, Nicks let the words slip out like lines of poetry, softly and packed with the emotional weight they’ve carried since she penned the song 30 years ago.

The pair share a musical bond that can’t be broken, which could explain why they and their Fleetwood Mac bandmates, sans Christy McVie, are in the studio now recording a new album.

Nicks is forging new but seemingly just as solid bonds with her newest friends, Crow and Maines. She gushed over both women, crediting Crow with the very existence of her latest album, “Trouble in Shangri-La.” She said that after two days in the studio with Maines, she felt as if they pair had been performing together a lifetime.

Nicks also let her friends hog the spotlight individually, which gave Henley a chance to resurrect two of his classics: “End of the Innocence” and “Boys of Summer.” Buckingham jammed on the guitar and then invited Fleetwood to bang on the drums for a number.

But the applause was most deafening when Nicks was solo, spinning a tale of a “Gold Dust Woman” or asking the question “Has Anyone Ever Written Anything For You,” not anticipating an answer.

The crowd answered back by singing along.

For a little while, Sept. 11 and all that has come after it didn’t exist, and the tears that Stevie Nicks was holding back could just as easily have been tears of joy.

The tao of Stevie

Modern-day enchantress Stevie Nicks to weave her spell at the TECO on Tuesday

By Nancy Stetson
Naples Florida Daily News
Friday, September 21, 2001

Stevie Nicks is a modern-day enchantress, weaving magic with her songs.

Even her tunes boast other-worldly themes, with titles such as “Enchanted,” “Dreams,” “Sorcerer,” “Planets of the Universe.”

On Tuesday at 7:30 p.m., Stevie Nicks brings her musical mysticism to the TECO Arena in Estero.

“I like her voice and I like her spirituality, which I think comes through in her songs,” says Sally Maitland, of the Make A Wish Foundation in Bonita Springs. “She’s grown spiritually, and it’s reflected in her music.

“Her voice is so distinctive. That’s something that stands out in all the songs — she’s got a great voice.

“She’s been through some tough times,” Maitland adds. “She’s not shy about singing about it. She struggles with a lot, like a lot of people in this generation. She’s gone through a lot of personal challenges and issues, so it’s nice to see someone who has gone through things and come out the other side successfully.”

Nicks has battled broken hearts, cocaine addiction, an addiction to prescription drugs, weight gain, writer’s block and depression. During her current tour, she had to cancel a few shows due to acute bronchitis.

Nicks and high-school sweetheart Lindsey Buckingham joined Fleetwood Mac at the end of 1974, mixing California rock with Mac’s British blues sound. The group’s self-named album went platinum and produced such hits as “Over My Head,” “Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win)” and “Say You Love Me.”

Their next album, “Rumours,” went on to become one of the best-selling albums of all time, with hits such as “Don’t Stop,” “Dreams” and “Go Your Own Way.” (The band eventually performed “Don’t Stop” for President Clinton’s inaugural and for a surprise farewell party for him.)

But in 1980, the band members started concentrating on solo success.

Nicks soon became known for her hits “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around,” “Edge of Seventeen (Just Like the White Winged Dove)” and “Leather and Lace.”

She was also known for her unique sense of style, dressing in flowing dresses, lace shawls and English silk top hats.

Seven years after her last effort, Nicks has released a new solo album, called “Trouble in Shangri-La.” The CD includes guest artists Macy Gray, Sarah McLachlan, Lindsey Buckingham, Dixie Chick Natalie Maines and Sheryl Crow, who co-produced five cuts.

In a press release from her label, Reprise Records, Nicks says, “My music often unfolds like the book of my life. I believe in telling the truth … actually, it’s the only way I can exist as a writer. Every step along the path of my life, I’ve been writing it all down, taking incredibly detailed notes. Instead of partying, I run back to my room, open my journal, and pour out my heart onto paper. It can take minutes, or it can take all night. But it’s always deep. And it’s always real.”

Her lyrics explore the pain of lost love and separation. In “Bombay Sapphires” she sings: “You — beloved/Were to me — everything/That love stood for/To love one another for awhile/Was enough — /It was all that I lived for/How can I go on without you/Can I go on —without you/I tell myself — this time/I’m going to have to — /Move on.”

And in “Love Changes” she sings: “It wasn’t that I didn’t love you/I just couldn’t make you see/That as hard as I tried/To make it all better/It was not better for me/The love that I gave you was…/All around you/There was nothing left for me/But I hate to say it/But I saw it coming/My feelings were changing.”

And, at 53, she still has that distinctive voice that sounds like a little girl with a worldly wise huskiness.

Jonathan Spafford, 16, a junior at Barron Collier High School, likes Nicks’ style.

“She’s raw, she’s so uncut,” he says. “She’s real. She has her own way of things. She’s unique.”

His friend, Blair Eckhardt, 16, a junior at Gulf Coast High School, agrees. “There’s nothing to describe her (unique) voice,” she says. “She doesn’t follow the formula of today’s music.

“When I saw her in the Destiny’s Child video, (“Bootylicious”), I was excited she was trying to appeal to a younger audience.

“What do I like about her? It’s everything. I like her voice.

“I think she is an amazing artist.”

Stevie Nicks unveils full summer itinerary

Stevie Nicks has confirmed more dates for a summer North American tour in support of her new Reprise album Trouble in Shangri-La. The trek will now begin July 6 in Burgettstown, Pa., and keep her on the road through August.

Trouble in Shangri-La debuted at No. 5 on the Billboard 200 earlier this month, earning Nicks her highest album chart showing since 1983, when The Wild Heart bowed at the same position. First single “Every Day” is No. 19 on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart this week.

Here are Stevie Nicks’ confirmed tour dates:

July 6: Burgettstown, Pa. (Post Gazette Pavilion)

July 7: Clarkston, Mich. (DTE Energy Music Theatre)

July 10: Rosemont, Ill. (Allstate Arena)

July 11: Cincinnati (Riverbend Music Center)

July 13: Hartford, Conn. (Meadows Music Theater)

July 14: Mansfield, Mass. (Tweeter Center)

July 17: Camden, N.J. (Tweeter Waterfront)

July 18: Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio (Blossom Music Center)

July 20: Wantagh, N.Y. (Jones Beach)

July 21: Holmdel, N.J. (PNC Bank Arts Center)

July 24: Mansfield, Mass. (Tweeter Center)

July 25: Virginia Beach, Va. (Verizon Wireless Amphitheater)

July 27: Charlotte, N.C. (Verizon Wireless Amphitheater)

July 28: Bristow, Va. (Nissan Pavilion)

July 30: Atlanta (Chastain Park Amphitheater)

Aug. 3: Dallas (Smirnoff Music Centre)

Aug. 4: Houston (Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion)

Aug. 7: Albuquerque, N.M. (Journal Pavilion)

Aug. 8: Denver (Fiddlers Green Amphitheater)

Aug. 11: Portland, Ore. (Rose Garden Arena)

Aug. 12: Seattle (Key Arena)

Aug. 14: Concord, Calif. (The Chronicle Pavilion)

Aug. 15: Mountain View, Calif. (Shoreline Amphitheater)

Aug. 17: Irvine, Calif. (Verizon Wireless Amphitheater)

Aug. 18: Phoenix (Desert Sky Pavilion)

Aug. 21-22: Universal City, Calif. (Universal City)

Aug. 24: San Diego (Coors Amphitheater)

Aug. 25: Las Vegas (Aladdin Theater)

Aug. 28: Bonner Springs, Kan. (Sandstone Amphitheater)

Aug. 29: St. Louis (Riverport Amphitheater)

Aug. 31: Noblesville, Ind. (Verizon Wireless Music Center)

Sept. 1: Columbus, Ohio (Polaris Amphitheater)

Stevie Nicks confirms North American tour

By Keith Caulfield
Billboard
May 15, 2001

Stevie Nicks will tour North America this summer and fall in support of her new Reprise album Trouble in Shangri-La. The full itinerary is not yet finalized, but according to Nicks’ official Web site, the trek will begin July 6 in Pittsburgh and keep her on the road through late September.

Trouble in Shangri-La debuted at No. 5 on The Billboard 200 earlier this month, earning Nicks her highest album chart showing since 1983, when The Wild Heart bowed at the same position. First single Every Day is No. 21 on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart this week.

Don’t expect Nicks to drench her live sets with songs from the new album. “I learned an important lesson back during the first Rumours tour with Fleetwood Mac,” she told Billboard in January. “You can’t shove new songs down your audience’s throat. You can do three or four at the most.”

“On that Rumours tour,” Nicks added, “we did most of that album, and people didn’t want any part of it. They want familiarity. They want the comfort of songs that feel like old friends. You can’t exploit your fans by forcing them to embrace songs they don’t know yet.”

Here are Stevie Nicks’ confirmed tour dates:

July 6: Pittsburgh (venue TBA)

July 7: Clarkston, Mich. (DTE Energy Music Theatre)

July 14: Mansfield, Mass. (Tweeter Center)

July 21: Holmdel, N.J. (PNC Bank Arts Center)

July 25: Raleigh, N.C. (Walnut Creek)

Aug. 3: Dallas (Smirnoff Music Centre)

Sept. 4: Noblesville, Ind. (Verizon Wireless Music Center)