Stevie Nicks chats about her life, career, greatest treasure

Stevie Nicks, 24 Karat Gold Tour, The Forum, Los Angeles, December 18 2016
(Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

Stevie Nicks talks with Sarah Daniell on the eve of her New Zealand tour with The Pretenders.

What can you see out your window right now ?

The most exquisite view of Melbourne ever. A beautiful, mirrored building that reflects the entire city and the ocean.

What’s your current state of mind ?

On one hand, Australia has been amazing and I can’t wait to get to New Zealand. On the other hand, I just lost my best friend, Tom Petty.

A 20-something colleague wanted to ask how does she join your coven – because she wants to sign up – do you ever get used to that level of fandom that spans generations – does that still surprise you?

As of now, I don’t have a coven. But if I get one, I’ll let you know. It makes me feel like when I was 20 and I knew that I wanted to be a rock and roll star, that I made the right decision to go through the next 40 to 50 years and bring as much wisdom as I could to the people that like my music.

As a female lead singer did you feel as though you were “representing” for women? Empowering them?

Absolutely. Always … then and now.

With all the news coming out of Hollywood now – do you see or did you see similarities with the way female artists were treated by powerful men? Was that your experience?

It was not my experience, but in the beginning, Christine and I made a pact that we would never be treated like second-class citizens. We were also always protected by Mick, John and Lindsey.

You said back in 1977, in an interview, you were tired of touring. How do you manage that now – what tricks help you ride that challenge of travelling and performing?

It is not really that you are tired of touring, you just get tired after being on the road for a long period of time. It’s a lot of work. Especially when you’re ancient. I’m very lucky to be able to fly privately most of the time, which makes all the travel a lot easier. If there is a beautiful hotel suite in the city, I find it. How you travel and where you stay is your home, so that is a huge part of how much rest you get and how good you feel.

You also said you love old things. What old thing is your greatest treasure?

A spectacular antique diamond ring that Christine McVie gave me in 1997.

Do you ever suffer imposter syndrome or have you always felt that you are where you belong?

No, I have never suffered imposter syndrome. I have always felt I am exactly where I am supposed to be, doing exactly what I was supposed to be doing.

Who or what is the rock in your life?

My best friends, who have been around from the beginning …

What current artist rocks you?

I am currently obsessively listening to Lorde and Haim.

When was the first time someone else noticed and remarked on your voice – how old were you and what impression did it leave?

When I was in fourth grade, my granddad came to Texas, where we lived, with a bunch of 45 records. And he played all of them for me, and I just started singing along. He told me what a great harmony singer I was and that he thought I was going to be a singer. And then I moved on to R & B.

When you reflect on your life and career, what is the one thing you would change, if you could.

Well, there is only one thing and it’s kind of a bummer. It would be not having walked into the office of the doctor who prescribed a medication called Klonopin for me, which ultimately ruined my life for eight years.

What can we look forward to at the concerts in Auckland and Dunedin?

Lots of music, some unfamiliar, some very familiar, lots of stories about who, when and why they were written. Really a lot of fun.

Sarah Daniell / NZ Herald (Weekend) / Saturday, November 18, 2017

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